Architecture
Displaying until 19 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

ArchitectureAndUs - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!

With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays launches a unique digital space and portal for people to promote and share their passion for Architecture.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and help promote the passion that is Architecture!

Related

ArchitectureAndUs - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!




With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays launches a unique digital space and portal for people to promote and share their passion for Architecture.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and help promote the passion that is Architecture!


ArchitectureAndUs is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

ArchitectureAndUs is a digital space for people who are passionate about architecture and want to do whatever they can to promote their passion.

At ArchitectureAndUs, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

ArchitectureAndUs

ArchitectureAndUs will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for architecture.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts. 

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for architecture.

 

 

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70 passion points
Architecture
Displaying until 18 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

Are you passionate about Architecture? Join Us!

ArchitectureAndUs is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Architecture and connect with people who share their passion.

Related

Are you passionate about Architecture? Join Us!




ArchitectureAndUs is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Architecture and connect with people who share their passion.


ArchitectureAndUs is all about engaging people in the promotion of architecture and the recognition that our buildings are there for us all to enjoy and appreciate.

ArchitectureAndUs is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

 

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70 passion points
Construction & regeneration
19 Feb 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - February 2019

A couple of windows have been installed on Two Chamberlain Square as the exterior columns rise, some nice views of the building as it sits amongst the city's classic and modern architecture. Lots of photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

Related

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - February 2019




A couple of windows have been installed on Two Chamberlain Square as the exterior columns rise, some nice views of the building as it sits amongst the city's classic and modern architecture. Lots of photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
11 Feb 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

Construction at Arena Central - February 2019

The construction focus at Arena Central is now on Three Arena Central (HMRC Midlands) but the finished One Centenary Square (HSBC UK) offers some nice architectural detail photos, lots in this update covering 6th and 10th February.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

Related

Construction at Arena Central - February 2019




The construction focus at Arena Central is now on Three Arena Central (HMRC Midlands) but the finished One Centenary Square (HSBC UK) offers some nice architectural detail photos, lots in this update covering 6th and 10th February.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
08 Feb 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - February 2019

Two Chamberlain Square is onto cladding installation and the front colonnade extention is almost complete. The extra columns really help to start showing the emerging architectural style of the building. More photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

Related

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - February 2019




Two Chamberlain Square is onto cladding installation and the front colonnade extention is almost complete. The extra columns really help to start showing the emerging architectural style of the building. More photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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90 passion points
Construction & regeneration
07 Feb 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - February 2019

One Chamberlain Square is well on the way to completion with just a few external details to finish of. In the sunlight it is actually a very reflective building, lots of photos in this update.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

Related

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - February 2019




One Chamberlain Square is well on the way to completion with just a few external details to finish of. In the sunlight it is actually a very reflective building, lots of photos in this update.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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90 passion points
Construction & regeneration
03 Feb 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - February 2019

Bank Tower Two at the Leftbank development is now structurally complete, a beautiful day for this photo update, more in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - February 2019




Bank Tower Two at the Leftbank development is now structurally complete, a beautiful day for this photo update, more in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
25 Jan 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - January 2019

Two Chamberlain Square is now structurally complete, the front collanade almost finished, work on the exterior next. Local people will be able to stop calling it the 'car park' soon. More photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

 

Related

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square - January 2019




Two Chamberlain Square is now structurally complete, the front collanade almost finished, work on the exterior next. Local people will be able to stop calling it the 'car park' soon. More photos in the full post.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

 


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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90 passion points
Construction & regeneration
24 Jan 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - January 2019

Bank Tower Two on Broad Street is now structurally complete with the cladding chasing up behind fast.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

 

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - January 2019




Bank Tower Two on Broad Street is now structurally complete with the cladding chasing up behind fast.

Map of the site

Birmingham developments overview map

 


 

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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70 passion points
Construction & regeneration
15 Jan 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

Construction at Arena Central - January 2019

The construction of Three Arena Central, the new HQ for HMRC Midlands, is having more of the steel structure intalled. It's starting to look really dense in this part of the city. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

Construction at Arena Central - January 2019




The construction of Three Arena Central, the new HQ for HMRC Midlands, is having more of the steel structure intalled. It's starting to look really dense in this part of the city. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
26 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018

Wates Group's Bank Tower Two is now completing the final floor, the top two stories being higher floors that are now clearly visible. Many photos in this update covering 16th and 22nd December.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018




Wates Group's Bank Tower Two is now completing the final floor, the top two stories being higher floors that are now clearly visible. Many photos in this update covering 16th and 22nd December.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

Check out this great map of Birmingham development and contruction projects:

Greater Birmingham Developments

Courtesy: @GtrBhamDev

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
24 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018

The construction of PwC's new building, One Chamberlain Square at Paradise Birmingham is almost complete externally with just a few details to finish off and the eventual removal of the external lifts. 12 more photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018




The construction of PwC's new building, One Chamberlain Square at Paradise Birmingham is almost complete externally with just a few details to finish off and the eventual removal of the external lifts. 12 more photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

 

Check out this great map of Birmingham development and contruction projects:

Greater Birmingham Developments

Courtesy: @GtrBhamDev

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90 passion points
Construction & regeneration
09 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018

Some nice festive tones in the lighting conditions for this update with the tower just shy of topping out. See more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018




Some nice festive tones in the lighting conditions for this update with the tower just shy of topping out. See more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
03 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018

A bit of a grey day for this December construction update, mainly photos from the Library of Birmingham's 'Secret Garden' over looking the site and some new perspectives.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018




A bit of a grey day for this December construction update, mainly photos from the Library of Birmingham's 'Secret Garden' over looking the site and some new perspectives.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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83 passion points
Architecture
28 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Castles within the West Midlands region

Lets take a look at some of the castles that remain in the West Midlands region. Dudley Castle (West Midlands county), Tamworth Castle (Staffordshire), Kenilworth Castle and Warwick Castle (Warwickshire). Dudley also includes a zoo. Warwick is now like a Merlin Entertainments place. Kenilworth is English Heritage ruins and gardens. Tamworth is small but intact.

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Castles within the West Midlands region




Lets take a look at some of the castles that remain in the West Midlands region. Dudley Castle (West Midlands county), Tamworth Castle (Staffordshire), Kenilworth Castle and Warwick Castle (Warwickshire). Dudley also includes a zoo. Warwick is now like a Merlin Entertainments place. Kenilworth is English Heritage ruins and gardens. Tamworth is small but intact.


Dudley Castle

Located in Dudley, West Midlands, these days it is a part of Dudley Zoo. It is on Castle Hill. A Grade I listed building.

A castle was built here soon after the Norman Conquest and was a wooden motte and bailey castle. The castle was rebuilt as a stone fortification in the 12th century, but was demolished in the orders of King Henry II. The castle was rebuilt during the 13th century. The tower we see today above the zoo was built in the 14th century. It was slighted by Parliamentarian forces during the English Civil War. There is a pair of Russian cannons that were brought back from the Crimean War. They were brought to Dudley in 1857. You can see one below from the view above the track at the zoo.

One of the stone walls and corner turrets at Dudley Castle, seen within the grounds of Dudley Zoo. This dates from the 14th century.

Dudley Castle can be seen from many places in Dudley Town Centre. This is the view from close to Dudley Sixth Form College. You can see how badly slighted the tower was on the right from here.

This view was from Priory Park in Dudley. England flag flying proudly.

This view of Dudley Castle was from Trindle Road in Dudley. The turret from the wall is seen below. From this view taken in October 2016, you can see both of the Russian cannons. Dudley currently has no railway station, but there might be a future Midland Metro line through the town. At present you can get buses there from Birmingham (bus stops are close to outside of the zoo).

Tamworth Castle

Located in Tamworth, Staffordshire. While the castle is now in Staffordshire, before boundary changes in 1889 it used to be in Warwickshire.

You might enter the castle grounds via the Holloway Lodge. A Grade II listed building, it resembles a castle gatehouse. The lodge was built in 1810. Tamworth Castle itself can be seen from above and is a Grade I listed building. A Norman castle built in 1080. The site served as the residence of the Mercian kings during the Anglo Saxon period, but fell into disuse during the Viking invasions.

Within the Castle Grounds there is a statue of Ethelfleda (also known as Æthelflæd). She was the The Lady of the Mercians in 913. The statue dates to 1000 years later in 1913 and is Grade II listed. She was the daughter of Alfred the Great. She led the defence of Mercia against the Danes, fortified Tamworth and other towns.

Tamworth Castle seen on top of the hill. Was a motte and bailey castle. Rebuilt in the 12th century, with repairs and reconstruction during the 13th century. The castle is now a museum. In March 2012 I couldn't see if it was open or not.

Heading up the path, getting closer to Tamworth Castle for a walk around the perimeter. Was nice views of the River Anker from up here. The castle was continuously in use from the 11th and 12th centuries until the 17th century. From the 16th century it was adapted as a residence, but fell into disrepair by the 18th century. The castle was sold to the Tamworth Corporation in the late 19th century (now Tamworth Borough Council).

A look round the back of the castle close up. The council has regularly maintained the castle and turned it into a tourist attraction. The grounds have been landscaped. You can get a train to Tamworth Station from Birmingham New Street, if you wish to visit this castle.

Kenilworth Castle

Located in Kenilworth, Warwickshire. It is now managed by English Heritage. It's a Grade I listed building, and was built from the Norman period to the Tudor period. The castle was the subject of a six month long Siege of Kenilworth in 1266. The castle was founded in the 1120s around a Norman great tower.

From this view you can see the Leicester's Building and The Great Tower, as you enter the castle grounds. On the August 2017 bank holiday weekend was an event called the Clash of Knights (actors were in medieval costumes).

A view of the ruined  Leicester's Building. Below was tents and canopies for that medieval bank holiday weekend event that took place at the time. Recreating what it could have been like in the 12th, 13th or 14th centuries. This tower block was built between 1571 and 1572 by Queen Elizabeth I's favourite Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. It was built to provide private lodgings for the queen and her close servants. She visited in 1572 and again in 1575.

This is The Great Tower. Kenilworth Castle was founded in the 1120s by Geoffrey de Clinton, Lord Chamberlain and treasurer to Henry I. The tower is one of the castles earliest surviving features. The Norman keep, or 'great tower' was always the most commanding building at the castle. Most of the base structure was built from 1124 until 1130. King John added an open fighting gallery around 1210 to 1215. Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester altered it in the late 16th century. He enlarged the window openings and may have used the upper floors to display paintings. During the Civil War in the 1640s, it was slighted.

There are steps up to the Strong Tower. This view was from outside of the Great Tower. You can climb up to the top. There are views of the Outer Court from the window openings of the ruined tower. Underneath there was also cellars that you can have a look at. This tower, along with the Great Hall to the left was built between 1373 and 1380 by John of Gaunt, the third son of Edward III. These parts of the castle were slighted during the Civil War in the 1640s and 1650s.

The view of the castle from the Elizabethan Garden. From here you can see the Great Tower on the left. The garden is a recreation of the The Queen's Privy Garden. There are car parks at the castle, but you can also park at car parks in Kenilworth Town Centre, and get a free bus to the castle from Johnsons (this was on the Bank Holiday visit, not sure if they do that when it's not a bank holiday). Since Spring 2018 when Kenilworth Station opened, that has given visitors from Birmingham an alternate route to get to the castle. Trains from Birmingham New Street to Coventry, then on the branch line to Leamington Spa (get off at Kenilworth). Or from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Solihull) towards Leamington Spa. Change trains towards Coventry. The castle is a 20 minute walk away from the station in Kenilworth.

Warwick Castle

Located in Warwick, Warwickshire. It is operated by Merlin Entertainments. It's a medieval castle that started after the Norman Conquest and was developed from 1068 onwards. It is next to the River Avon.

Seen from Castle Hill next to this roundabout is the Warwick Castle Lodge. It is a Grade II listed building and was built from 1796 until 1797 by Samuel Muddiman and John Williams. It has Neo-Gothic details. You can enter the castle grounds from this lodge. Tickets for the castle can be quite pricey, but it maybe possible to get an online discount.

The castle was bought by the Tussauds Group in 1978, hence why there are loads of waxwork figures around the castle. The castle started off as a motte and bailey castle. It was later rebuilt in stone during the 12th century. The facade opposite the town was refortified during the Hundred Years War in the 14th century. In 1604 it was granted to Sir Fulke Greville by James I. The Greville family, who became Earls of Warwick in 1759 held it until Tussauds bought it in 1978.

This is a view of Guy's Tower. Probably named after Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, during the 14th century.

This is a view of the Caesar's Tower. The view was from Banbury Road in Warwick. It also dates to the 14th century. The towers dominate the skyline of Warwick from the nearby houses in the area. The town centre isn't that far from the castle. It's well worth a look for it's mix of architecture.

Usually on my visits to Warwick, I'm just there to have a look around the town, so the earlier photos didn't get to see the castle from the river. In May 2016 I found a view of the castle from the Castle Bridge on Banbury Road. From here you can see people on paddle boats that look like swans or dragons. Boat hire is from St Nicholas Park. There is a weir at the far end of the river, so people in the boats have to turn back.

The castle really does look magnificent from here! Queen Elizabeth I visited the castle in 1566 and again in 1572. John Dudley was granted the castle in 1547 and was given the title Earl of Warwick. The title went extinct in 1590 on the death of Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick (an elder brother of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester who owned Kenilworth Castle). There is almshouses in Warwick called Lord Leycester Hospital. Robert Dudley founded it in 1571. You can get trains on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill or Solihull to Warwick. The castle is a short walk away from there.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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55 passion points
Architecture
26 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

National Trust properties in Warwickshire

Let's head out of Birmingham and into Shakespeare's County, Warwickshire with a look at four National Trust properties that you can visit. Coughton Court, Packwood House, Baddesley Clinton and Charlecote Park. The best time to go is usually in the spring or summer, although early autumn the weather would be fine to go. But you can visit them in any season!

Related

National Trust properties in Warwickshire




Let's head out of Birmingham and into Shakespeare's County, Warwickshire with a look at four National Trust properties that you can visit. Coughton Court, Packwood House, Baddesley Clinton and Charlecote Park. The best time to go is usually in the spring or summer, although early autumn the weather would be fine to go. But you can visit them in any season!


Coughton Court

It's a Grade I listed building, located between Studley and Alcester in Warwickshire. It is an English Tudor country house. The Coughton estate has been owned by the Throckmorton family since 1409. The gatehouse at Coughton was built as early as 1536. The courtyard was closed on all four sides until 1651, when Parliamentary soldiers burnt the fourth (east) wing during the English Civil War.

The West Front with two wings either side of it. The North Wing is on the left, while The South Wing is to the right. The Gatehouse is made of Limestone ashlar. The wings are timber framed with lath, plaster infill and brick.

This view of the courtyard seen with the Formal Garden from the other side of the River Arrow. The entrance is via the bottom of the Gatehouse. You can only go into the South Wing of the house. The North Wing is the private residence of the current members of the family. The East Wing must have survived until a fire in 1688. It was demolished in the 1780s.

You can head up a spiral staircase while on your visit to the house and get wonderful views of the estate from the roof. It is on the top of the Gatehouse. This view towards the Formal Garden, with the North Wing on the left and the South Wing on the right. The missing East Wing (burnt in the 17th century, demolished in the 18th) would have completed the courtyard.

The Dining Room. It was the Great Chamber in Elizabethan times. The principal first-floor reception room where the Throckmortons would have entertained important guests. It appears to have become a Dining Room in the early 19th century.

The Parlour. A bit like a lounge or living room. The room was off The Saloon Passage. It couldn't be The Yellow Drawing Room  as that room is in The Gatehouse to the left of the staircase.

Packwood House

It's a Grade I listed building, located near Lapworth in Warwickshire. The National Trust has owned it since 1941. It's a timber-framed Tudor manor house. The house was built for  John Fetherston between 1556 and 1560. The  last member of the Fetherston family died in 1876. In 1904 a Birmingham industrialist Alfred Ash purchased the house. It was inherited by Graham Baron Ash in 1925. The great barn of the farm was converted into a Tudor-style hall and was connected to the main house by the addition of a Long Gallery in 1931.

The West Front of Packwood House. There is sundial on this side. There is a drive around the lawn. There used to be an uninterrupted view of the house from this side. The 'Birmingham entrance' is how the owner Graham Baron Ash used to refer to this part of his estate. So when he requested a ride in his white Rolls Royce for business his chauffeur would know which entrance to park in readiness. But there has been a hedge in the way since the National Trust took over. They are hoping to reinstate the old carriageway to it's former glory.

The South Front seen from the Raised Terrace and Carolean Garden. The house is also known as Mr Ash's House. Baron Ash donated the house to the National Trust in 1941, but continued to live here until 1947, when he moved to Wingfield Castle.

The main entrance to the house and gardens is via the gate to the left. Seen from Packwood Lane to the right is the Outbuildings. Built in the mid 17th century, they were originally barns. Baron Ash converted them to rooms as part of the house, as if they were always like that (they weren't). Inside during your visit you will go into the Long Gallery and the Great Hall. Both are lined with old tapestries and period furniture. The Great Hall is a Tudor style hall with a sprung floor for dancing.

The Entrance Hall is the first room you would enter. If you have a large bag, then you can give it to a volunteer who would put it in trunk, and they would give you a token (which you would give back when coming back to collect your bag before going back outside). There is a portrait of King Henry VIII to the right. Above is a balcony / passageway that leads to the Fetherston Room (which has photos from the early 20th century showing Baron Ash's change to the house).

The Drawing Room. There is two rooms dedicated to Queen Mary (the wife of George V) as she visited the house in 1927. A chair she sat in the Great Hall is in this room, and a cup she drank tea from is now in a glass case. There is a piano to the right of the room.

Baddesley Clinton

A Grade I listed building, it is a moated manor house, located 8 miles north-west of Warwick in Warwickshire. The house originated in the 13th century. The manor was purchased in 1438 by John Brome, who passed it to his son, Nicholas Brome. The house ended up in the Ferrers family possession from the 16th century until they sold it to the National Trust in 1980.

The view of the moated manor house from the Forecourt. There is a bridge over the moat that leads to the inner courtyard.

The moat goes all the way around the house. This view is from the Walled Garden. There is coat of arms on all the windows around the house. There used to be a bridge on this side, if you notice the stonework to the bottom of the middle chimney breast. There is a room with a view on the first floor that was built in 1460, which is to the left of where the bridge used to be. It was probably removed when the current bridge was built along with the gatehouse in 1536.

After crossing the bridge over the moat, you enter the Inner Courtyard. It has a formal garden in the middle. One side of the garden you can see the moat and the path on the other side. Entrance to the house is this way.

The Great Hall. At this end is a fireplace in the middle of the room, and a pair of doors leading to the drawing room and a small dining room. Tapestry was on the wall to the left.

The Priest's Bedroom on the first floor. A bit of a small Catholic chapel. During Elizabethan times it was illegal to be Catholic, and houses like this had a priest hole (to hide the priest). You can find the priest hole from the kitchen (steps goes below a trapdoor). It would have been used in the 1590s.

Charlecote Park

A Grade I listed building surrounded by it's own deer park, on the banks of the River Avon near Wellesbourne, about 4 miles east of Stratford-upon-Avon and 5.5 miles south of Warwick. It is a grand 16th century country house. The National Trust has administered it since 1946. The Lucy family owned the land from 1247. Charlecote Park was built in 1558 by Sir Thomas Lucy.

As you approach the house from the entrance gate, you see the Gatehouse. Don't be surprised if you see deer crossing from one section of the lawn to the other (over the path), after all this is a deer park! The Gatehouse is a Grade I listed building and was built in 1560. Brick laid to English bond with limestone ashlar dressings. There is exhibition rooms on both sides of the gatehouse, although you can't go to the upper floors. One room had a bit of Lucy family history. The other room at the time of my visit was set up like a Red Cross World War One hospital room (with a bed). People with walking difficulties, can get a golf buggy to take them around the estate.

After passing the Gatehouse, you get your first view of the house. Once known as Charlecote Hall, today it is simply known as just Charlecote Park. A magnificent view, especially on a day with a blue sky (like this one in early September 2018). The house begun construction in 1558. It was expanded in the 19th century. The extensions were built for George and Mary Elizabeth Lucy. The house entrance is straight ahead.

This view of the house from the Parterre. A formal garden with colourful flowers. It is next to the River Avon on this side, with fine views of the Deer Park. The area to the right of the house is private.

The Dining Room at Charlecote Park. A long table laid out as it could have been like in the 19th century for the Lucy family. The house is now much more Victorian than Elizabethan, as George Hammond Lucy (who inherited in 1823), recreated the house in his own style (he was High Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1831).

The Library. Table and chairs laid out for reading next to the fireplace. There is portraits around the room with Tudor and Stuart King's and Queen's as well as members of the Lucy family. Elizabeth I and Charles I are above the fireplace. Queen Elizabeth I actually once stayed at Charlecote in the room that is now the Drawing Room.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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55 passion points
Construction & regeneration
22 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

The main structure of Bank Tower Two on Broad Street is just a floor short of topping out, it looks great on the skyline at the moment all lit up with temporary lighting. A big gallery of photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two




The main structure of Bank Tower Two on Broad Street is just a floor short of topping out, it looks great on the skyline at the moment all lit up with temporary lighting. A big gallery of photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Architecture
21 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Palaces in France, Italy and Spain

Photos of palaces that I've seen on various holidays over the years in France, Italy and Spain. In cities such as Lyon and Paris in France, Florence and Naples in Italy, and Seville and Granada in Spain. Some of them are now museums or town halls.

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Palaces in France, Italy and Spain




Photos of palaces that I've seen on various holidays over the years in France, Italy and Spain. In cities such as Lyon and Paris in France, Florence and Naples in Italy, and Seville and Granada in Spain. Some of them are now museums or town halls.


Florence, Italy

This building is the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, located in the Piazza della Signoria. The square is usually crowded with tourists. There is a replica statue of Michelangelo's David outside of the palace. The palace is the town hall of Florence. It's original name was the Palazzo della Signoria after the Signoria of Florence, the ruling body of the Republic of Florence. It has had several other names in the past. The Grand Duke of Tuscany resided there, until they moved over to the other side of the River Arno to the Palazzo Pitti (over there is where you would find Boboli Gardens). The Uffizi Gallery is nearby over to the right (had a visit to that gallery). The Loggia dei Lanzi which is full of classical statues is over to the right. Seen here in June 2018.

Naples, Italy

This is the Palazzo Reale in the City of Naples in Southern Italy. Was formerly the Royal Palace, and was one of four residences for the Bourbon Kings of Naples during their rule of the Kingdom of Two Sicilies (1730-1860). Mostly built in the 17th century. It is in a square called the Piazza Trieste e Trento. These days the palace houses the Teatro San Carlo and the smaller Teatrino di Corte, the Biblioteca nazionale Vittorio Emanuele III, a museum, and offices, including those of the regional tourist board. Seen here in July 2012.

Verona, Italy

This palace in Verona, Italy is in the Piazza Bra, not far from the Verona Arena (Roman amphitheatre). It is the Palazzo Barbieri. It is a Neoclassical style palace. The palace was originally named the Palazzo della Gran Guardia Nuova and housed staff associated with the occupying Austrian Army forces. The building is now a town hall. It was built between 1836 and 1848. The visit to Verona was in July 2010.

Seville, Spain

A look at the Real Alcázar in Seville. Seen shortly after walking into the courtyard, this area is the Patio de la Monteria leading to the Palacio Mudéjar. The Alacazar was a Moorish palace, and is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Almohades was the first to build a palace here on the site of the current Alcazar. You can see Islamic art all over this palace, due to the fact that at one point in history, much of Spain was ruled by the Moors, until the reconquest of Spain. Although the palace we see today, was mostly a Christian palace in the Islamic architecture style, as the previous Abbadid Muslim residential fortress was destroyed after the Christian reconquest of Seville. My visit to the Alcazar was during June 2014.

Granada, Spain

Seen during a guided tour of the Alhambra in Granada, Spain. Was an Arabic palace and fortress built during the Islamic period of Spain. After the Christian reconquest the site became the Royal Court of Ferdinand and Isabella. It was built during the decline of the Nasrid dynasty. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This was during the tour of the Nasrid Palaces. At this stage I was at the Comares Palace - Chamber of the Ambassadors. Basically this was near the Throne Room. The palace here was the official residence of the king. As with the Alcazar in Seville, you can clearly see Islamic or Moorish art styles all over the palace, especially when exploring inside! Well worth a visit. I went on the guided tour during June 2014.

Cordoba, Spain

Another UNESCO World Heritage Site in Andalusia, Spain. This is the Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos. Spanish for "Alcázar of the Christian Monarchs". The fortress was one of the residences of Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. In early medieval times this was the site of a Visigoth fortress. When the Visigoths fell to the Umayyad conquest, the Umayyad rebuilt the structure. They later fell to the Abbasid Caliphate. The surviving member of the Umayyad Dynasty fled to Cordoba and used the Alcazar as their palace. Christian forces reconquered Cordoba in 1236. Construction of the present building began in 1328. Only part of the Moorish ruins remained, but it mostly looks like an Islamic structure as Alfonso XI of Castileused the Mudéjar style. After a period for somewhere to garrison Napoleon's troops in the 1810s, The Alcázar became a prison in 1821. The Spanish government made it a tourist attraction and national monument from 1950. The visit to Cordoba was in June 2014 (half way between Seville and Granada).

Aix-en-Provence, France

This building is the Palais de l'Archeveche in the city of Aix-en-Provence in Southern France (formerly the Archbishops Palace). It now houses the Musee des Tapisseries (Tapestry Museum). It dates to 1650-1730. The architect was Laurent Vallon. The Tapestry Museum is on the first floor of the palace in what was the state apartments. The tapstries were hidden during the French Revolution, and were discovered 50 years later hidden in the roof. The visit to this museum in Aix-en-Provence was during May 2011.

Lyon, France

This building was formerly a Benedictine convent of the 17th and 18th centuries, but is now the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. It's name in French is Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. It is located in the Place des Terreaux in Lyon. The building was restored between 1988 and 1998 but remained open to visitors during that time. It has a range of exhibits from ancient Egyptian art to the modern art period. There is a garden within a courtyard as you walk in or out of the museum with statues. They also have a collection of artworks from the Impressionists such as Monet and Picasso. There is fine views of the square outside where you can see a fountain (it was being restored in 2017). The visit to this museum in Lyon was during June 2017.

Paris, France

Seen from the opposite side of the River Seine on a coach tour of Paris was the Louvre. Originally it was the Palais du Louvre (Louvre Palace). A fortress built in the medieval period,it became a Royal Palace in the 14th century under Charles V of France. It was used from time to time as the main residence of the Kings of France. During the French Revolution is became the Musée du Louvre. The Old Louvre is on the site of 12th century fortress built by King Philip Augustus, while the New Louvre is the name given to the wings and extensions built during the time of Napoleon I and Napoleon III. Although this was originally the grand design of King Henry IV of France  in the late 16th century. When Louis XIV chose the Palace of Versailles as his main Palace in 1682, the Louvre was mostly left to display the royal collection. The Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres and the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture were in the building for 100 years from 1692 until the French Revolution. Passed through Paris on the way back from the Loire Valley in July 2009, before getting the Eurostar back to the UK.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. From different summer holidays (these weren't all in the same year).

Verona was in summer 2010. Naples was summer 2012. Florence was summer 2018. Seville, Granada and Cordoba was summer 2014. Aix-en-Provence was spring 2011. Lyon was summer 2017. Paris was summer 2009.

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30 passion points
Construction & regeneration
19 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

One Chamberlain Square is looking great in the winter sun and is looking almost like a completed building now, more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




One Chamberlain Square is looking great in the winter sun and is looking almost like a completed building now, more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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103 passion points
Construction & regeneration
13 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square

One Chamberlain Square is having the last of the sills at the top and bottom of the main tier, the stipes on the back are now on the full height of the building. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square




One Chamberlain Square is having the last of the sills at the top and bottom of the main tier, the stipes on the back are now on the full height of the building. More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


 

Photos by Daniel Sturley

Full Gallery of the Construction of One Chamberlain Square

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90 passion points
Architecture
13 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Calthorpe Estates: Edgbaston - a selection of Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town houses

Edgbaston the picture perfect suburb of Birmingham has long been managed by the Calthorpe Estates. You would see around white houses dating back to the Georgian and Regency periods, as well as from the Victorian era. Mostly the area between the Hagley Road, Harborne Road, Calthorpe Road and Church Road (and the connecting roads in the area).

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Calthorpe Estates: Edgbaston - a selection of Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town houses




Edgbaston the picture perfect suburb of Birmingham has long been managed by the Calthorpe Estates. You would see around white houses dating back to the Georgian and Regency periods, as well as from the Victorian era. Mostly the area between the Hagley Road, Harborne Road, Calthorpe Road and Church Road (and the connecting roads in the area).


St George's School Edgbaston

Located at 31 Calthorpe Road. A Grade II listed building dates to 1835. Was formerly the Edgbaston College for Girls. Mainly includes a large formerly detached Grecio-Egyptian villa. Extended in 1883-86 on the foundation of the college. The school additions were by the architect J. A. Chatwin.

27 and 28 Calthorpe Road

In 2015 this was occupied by the RoSPA. Grade II listed building, a pair of three storey semi-detached stucco Calthorpe Estate villas built in 1830. No 27 was altered in 1850.

37 and 38 Calthorpe Road

A pair of semi-detached stucco 2 storey villas built in 1835, they are Grade II listed. Canted pilaster bay windows was added in 1860. Otto Robert Frisch and Rudolf Peierls lived at no 38 while they were working at the University of Birmingham on nuclear research which led to the first atomic bomb (this was from February to March 1940).

41, 42 and 43 Calthorpe Road

This is a pair of semi-detached stucco faced Calthorpe Estate villas built in 1830, they are Grade II listed buildings. In 2015 WPR was at no 43. Canted bay windows were added in 1860.

3 and 4 Highfield Road

A pair of semi detached houses built in 1830. Stucco in the late Regency style. Some parts were later added in 1860. J. R. R. Tolkien lived at no 4 from 1910 until 1911. It is now the Highfield Day Nursery and Preschool

More more on J R R Tolkien see this post J.R.R. Tolkien's Birmingham (inspiration for The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings.

The Edgbaston - 18 Highfield Road

This is a Grade II listed building at 18 and 19 Highfield Road in Edgbaston. Built in 1840 it is a pair of symmetrical classical stucco villas. The right hand ground floor window of no 18 was replaced sometime between 1880 and 1890. There is coach house at no 18. The coach house at no 19 had been rebuilt. The Edgbaston is a Boutique Hotel & Cocktail Lounge.

 

Simpsons Restaurant - 20 Highfield Road

This property dates to 1840 and is Grade II listed. A large detached stucco villa. It's front entrance is on Westbourne Crescent. The rear on Highfield Road dates to 1855. Simpsons Restaurant was founded in 1993 by two chefs and it is one of Birmingham's restaurans with a Michelin Star.

The Highfield - 22 Highfield Road

The Highfield is a gastro pub that opened in recent years. Owned by the Peach family. The building is not listed, but it still retains an old sundial to the left! They modified the building removing two side doors that used to be there before.

26 Highfield Road

This property doesn't appear to be listed, but it has a blue plaque on it from the Birmingham Civic Society. Edward Richard Taylor (1838 - 1912) was an art teacher and William Howson Taylor (1876 - 1935) was a potter. They both lived here. The plaque was also presented by the Calthorpe Estates Residents Society.

Boston Tea Party - 30 Harborne Road

Boston Tea Party had originally hoped to open a cafe in Moseley, but the site they wanted later went to Prezzo (which was later replaced by Sorrento Lounge). Edgbaston is probably a better location for them here anyway. This building is not listed.

The Physician - 36 Harborne Road

The original building is over 180 years old dating to the 1830s. The BMI (Birmingham Medical Institute) was in this building from 1954 until their lease ran out in 2013. Later turned into a pub The Physician opened in 2016. The building is believed to have housed the 'Sampson Gangee Library for the History of Medicine' possibly commissioned in 1863 by Calthorpe Estates. It's on the corner with Highfield Road.

38 Harborne Road

Every Christmas the Calthorpe Estates places these Christmas reindeers at various places around Edgbaston. This property dates to about 1835 and is close to the corner with Highfield Road. There is a coach house to the left. It's a Grade II listed building.

105 Harborne Road

There is a blue plaque on this house for Francis Brett Young from the Birmingham Civic Society and the Francis Brett Young Society. A novelist, poet and physician, who lived here from 1905-6. The house itself is Grade II listed and dates to 1830. A pair of identical stucco houses. Both of the houses here have coach houses (now just garages).

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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50 passion points
Construction & regeneration
04 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley
News & Updates

Birmingham Construction Update - November 2018

Exchange Square now has it's main structure up to level with Maclaren House, a new crane has been installed on the site of 103 Colmore Row, the steel work on Three Centenary Square is rising around the central core, Bank Tower Two is up to the 30th floor and One Chamberlain Square is getting its final external details finished. Lots more photos and links to galleries in the full post.

Related

Birmingham Construction Update - November 2018




Exchange Square now has it's main structure up to level with Maclaren House, a new crane has been installed on the site of 103 Colmore Row, the steel work on Three Centenary Square is rising around the central core, Bank Tower Two is up to the 30th floor and One Chamberlain Square is getting its final external details finished. Lots more photos and links to galleries in the full post.


Eastside Construction Feature

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Bank Towers One and Two Feature

 

One Chamberlain Square Feature

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Crane Photography Feature 

 

Arena Central Feature

 

Two Chamberlain Square Feature

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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90 passion points
Construction & regeneration
01 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square

Two Chamberlain Square is continuing to rise at Paradise Birmingham, it's now looming over Centenary Way producing a wide canyon feel on the way down to the Museum and Art Gallery.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Two Chamberlain Square




Two Chamberlain Square is continuing to rise at Paradise Birmingham, it's now looming over Centenary Way producing a wide canyon feel on the way down to the Museum and Art Gallery.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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100 passion points
Construction & regeneration
29 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

Bank Tower Two now has it's main structure up to the 29th floor and much more cladding is installed or being prepared. The tower looks amazing in the winter sunlight! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two




Bank Tower Two now has it's main structure up to the 29th floor and much more cladding is installed or being prepared. The tower looks amazing in the winter sunlight! More photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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80 passion points
Construction & regeneration
21 Oct 2018 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of Bank Tower Two

The scene from the Library of Birmingham shows how Bank Tower Two is rising well above the others in the westside cluster with several floors still to go. Over 20 photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Related

The Construction of Bank Tower Two




The scene from the Library of Birmingham shows how Bank Tower Two is rising well above the others in the westside cluster with several floors still to go. Over 20 photos in this update.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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90 passion points
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