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Modern Architecture
11 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Cube from 2011 to The Big Hoot 2015

A gallery of photos I've taken of The Cube from early 2011 until 2015 when The Big Hoot owl sculpture trail was on. Over the years I have taken many views of The Cube from the City Centre. Either from the canals or from the nearby streets. Many different views of it to see. The only time I got the lift all the way up to the top was in the summer of 2015 to see The Big Hoot owl up there

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The Cube from 2011 to The Big Hoot 2015





A gallery of photos I've taken of The Cube from early 2011 until 2015 when The Big Hoot owl sculpture trail was on. Over the years I have taken many views of The Cube from the City Centre. Either from the canals or from the nearby streets. Many different views of it to see. The only time I got the lift all the way up to the top was in the summer of 2015 to see The Big Hoot owl up there


I've taken many views of The Cube over the years. This is a gallery of photos I've taken between 2011 and 2015. Most of them taken in 2011 and 2012. By 2013 the Library of Birmingham had opened, so some new views. By 2015 I went into The Cube to see the pair of Big Hoot owls, which you will see further down this post.

2011

These views of The Cube were taken during January 2011.

View from Upper Gough Street, looking down Upper Marshall Street.

The view below was from Washington Street.

Better view from the end of Washington Street, close to Commercial Street.

Close up from Wasington Street before going onto Commercial Street.

The rear entrance on Commercial Street. Was a website at the time called The Cube is Coming. Promising Amazing Views.

Looking up from Commercial Street towards the Crown.

Commercial Street from ground level.

Slightly further back on Commercial Street with the building to the left.

The Cube dominating every other building on Commercial Street.

There is also a view from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal between Granville Street and the Salvage Turn Bridge. This would have been from the Granville Street Bridge towards The Mailbox.

2012

Now for some views taken during February 2012.

This view of The Cube was taken from Granville Street near Washington Wharf. There is an old building surviving amongst all the modern ones here.

Views of The Cube taken from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal between Bath Row and Granville Street, February 2012.

In front of The Cube on the canalside is The Maltings, also called Davenports House, they are student accommodation for University College Birmingham (UCB).

You can get onto the canal from the steps at Bath Row near Bishopsgate Street. If you want to, get off the canal at the steps at Granville Street.

In fact I did get off the canal at Granville Street. One last view of The Cube from down here.

2013

Views of The Cube taken in May 2013.

This view below from Brindleyplace, while I was on Oozells Street. Looking down Berkley Street.

Another view from Oozells Street looking down Berkley Street below. Concrete one one of the nightclubs on Broad Street. The Rocket Club.

Detailed zoom in from Berkley Street towards the criss crosses patterns. A bit like TETRIS (and this was before Holiday Inn Express was built on Holliday Street).

Corner of the Crown zoomed up from Berkley Street.

In July 2013 there was a Mini below The Cube from the canalside. Was something about My First Mini.

In August 2013 I saw this Diving Sculpture from Waterfront Walk near the canalside towpath of the Worcester & Birmingham Canal opposite The Cube.

The artist was Cathy Lewis and she was commissioned to make it in 2006 by Charles Church Developments to create a large sculpture for a public site beside the new Register Office at Holliday Wharf, Birmingham. At the time a narrowboat name Eloiuse was moored up on the canal.

Slightly further back view of Cathy Lewis's Diving Sculpture from Waterfront Walk.

In the middle of September 2013 on a photo walk around Highgate, I spotted this view of The Cube from Angelina Street.

In September 2013, the then new Library of Birmingham opened to the public for the first time, and while there got some views of The Cube from there. This view was from Level 2, at the time known as the Knowledge floor.

View of The Cube from the Discovery Terrace at the Library of Birmingham which was on Level 3, known at the time as the Discovery floor.

Another view from the Discovery Terrace, with some of circular structure of the Library of Birmingham above.

In this December 2013 view below taken from Tyseley Station. The zoom on my then bridge camera probably went beyond into digital zoom which gets a bit pixelly. The area above the Tyseley DMU Depot. At the time I got a train from my local station, got off at Tyseley, then waited for another train on the line to Solihull.

2014

Not so many views taken of The Cube in 2014. In October 2014 I was looking for a blue plaque on Tindal Street in Balsall Heath when I spotted this view of The Cube. The Hyatt Hotel is just about visible from here to the right.

2015

From Centenary Square during January 2015. Winter Skate Birmingham (late Ice Skate Birmingham) was being dismantled after the end of the Christmas / Winter season. Saw this view of The Cube looking down Bridge Street. At the time the former Register Office (later House of Sport) had yet to be demolished for Arena Central. The Hyatt Hotel seen to the right. There was a JCB in Centenary Square,

The July 2015 visit to The Cube was to see the pair of Big Hoot owls that they had in the building.

A few floors down from the ground floor was Mr Architect by the artist Sam Pierpoint and the sponsor was The Cube. On this side the design had The Cube as the hair, Library of Birmingham as the wings, The Mailbox was on the legs and Selfridges as the feet.

The design had The Cube as the hair, Curzon Street Station at the back of the head, and the Library of Birmingham as the body and Selfridges as the feet.

This sign on the ground floor welcomed you to The Cube. Mr Architect was reachable via the lift or escalators to Level 5. For Owl-livia, you had to take the lift up to Level 25 to the Hotel Indigo Reception area.

After catching the lift up to Level 25 it was time to look at the next owl. Owl-livia was by the artist Charlie Langhorne and the sponsor was Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar and Grill Birmingham.

While at the top near Hotel Indigo and Marco Pierre White, I took an opportunity to get photos of the views from the top.

This view from the top of The Cube towards Jurys Inn and other buildings along Broad Street. It has changed a lot since then (I've not had a need to go back up to the top of The Cube since).

I may next cover The Cube from 2016 to 2020, but might be less photos.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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40 passion points
Classic Architecture
04 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

King Edward's School from New Street to Edgbaston

Did you know that one of the oldest schools in the country is in Birmingham? King Edward's School was founded by Edward VI in 1552. Taking over from the Guild of the Holy Cross. Located on New Street until 1936. They moved to a site in Edgbaston close to the University of Birmingham where they remain to this day. Former pupils include J. R. R. Tolkien, Sir Edward Burne-Jones and more.

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King Edward's School from New Street to Edgbaston





Did you know that one of the oldest schools in the country is in Birmingham? King Edward's School was founded by Edward VI in 1552. Taking over from the Guild of the Holy Cross. Located on New Street until 1936. They moved to a site in Edgbaston close to the University of Birmingham where they remain to this day. Former pupils include J. R. R. Tolkien, Sir Edward Burne-Jones and more.


King Edward's School

During the English Reformation which led to the Dissolution of the Monasteries, by 1547 all lands and religious buildings were confiscated by the state. This included the Guild of the Holy Cross in Birmingham. Which was located on New Street. It was founded in 1392 by three men: John Coleshill, John Goldsmith and William atte Slowe. The Guild was so important that by 1482, they placed the Master of the Guild higher than the High Sheriff of the borough.

Birmingham had no Grammar School, so John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland (who was the Lord of the Manor of Birmingham by 1552, having replaced the last Norman descended member of the de Birmingham family) gave permission to turn the Guild into a School in it's former hall on New Street. John Dudley gained the ownership of the Manor of Birmingham in 1536 (after falsely accusing Edward Birmyncham, the last of the line of Norman barons of highway robbery). 

King Edward VI granted a Royal Charter early in 1552 to found a school in his name. By the 1680s there was nearly 200 boys at the school and a foundation was set up. A Georgian building was built on the New Street site between 1731 and 1734.

The old image below shows the Free Grammar School as it was in the Georgian period. It was from an engraving published by W. Emans, 1829. It was demolished in the early 1830s. It suggests the building was built in 1706 (and not the 1730s dates).

Public domain image taken from Wikimedia here KES Free Grammar School original without tower. The original uploader to the Wikimedia Commons took it from a book called The Making of Birmingham: Being a History of the Rise and Growth of the Midland Metropolis, Published by J. L. Allday. By Robert Kirkup Dent in 1894.

This was replaced by the Victorian building designed by Charles Barry which was built from 1833 to 1837. He employed Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin for the interiors. Together they later designed the current Palace of Westminster (after the fire destroyed the old one in the 1830s).

This image below was from a photograph by Whitlock on New Street. It shows the spire of Christ Church in the distance (demolished in 1899).

Public domain image taken from Wikimedia here KES Free Grammar School Charles Barry. The original uploader to the Wikimedia Commons took it from a book called The Making of Birmingham: Being a History of the Rise and Growth of the Midland Metropolis, Published by J. L. Allday. By Robert Kirkup Dent in 1894.

The old building had become a fire risk by 1936, and they acquired a site in Edgbaston from Calthorpe Estates. Between Edgbaston Park Road and the Bristol Road (close to the University of Birmingham). The new school was finally completed by 1948, although there was some expansion in the 1950s.

Barry's school was demolished and replaced by the current office building called King Edward House at 135A New Street, built from 1936 to 1937. It includes restaurants and shops on the ground floor. The architects was Essex & Goodman. Pevsner refers to it as bland classical. The Odeon Cinema was built at the same time (1936-37) replacing the girls school. It was by Frank Verity & Samuel Beverley for Paramount Pictures. The Paramount Theatre opened in 1937. It didn't become an Odeon until 1942, months after the death of Oscar Deutsch. 

This view of King Edward House on New Street during January 2011. As you can see it is to the right of the Odeon Cinema.

I got a new photo of King Edward House back in January 2020. Hard to believe that we lost both a Georgian and Victorian building here. Yet alone the Tudor building that preceded both of them.

New Street in January 2013 while it was snowing. The cramped site of the old school didn't have it's own sports field at the back. And with Birmingham New Street Station behind, there wouldn't have been room for expansion on this site anyway.

Early morning on New Street in February 2020. Hard to believe a pandemic and lockdown would be declared at the end of March 2020. King Edward House seen to the left. Britannia Hotel on the right. Imagine the Houses of Parliament in Birmingham, well it would have been down here as King Edward VI Grammar School. Sadly after 100 years in 1936 the old building was in a bad condition and the school moved to the Edgbaston site, and the old building sadly demolished.

In early November 2008, a cousin from Australia came to visit us (several weeks before I lost my brother to cancer). And we took him to King Edward's School in Edgbaston (we thought his father went to this school, but it later turned out he went to King Edward VI Five Ways School instead).

The only building to survive from New Street was the school chapel. It was originally built as the upper corridor of the 1838 New Street School (by Charles Barry) and it was moved to Edgbaston in pieces (1938-40) by Holland W Hobbis, and was renovated and rebuilt in the 1950s.

The Chapel is a Grade II* listed building. It used to link the Grammar School to the Library ranges of Barry's school in New Street (built from 1833-38). Built of brick with stone dressings. The Chapel is used for services every Wednesday morning, when the Eucharist is celebrated by the school Chaplain.

Some more views of the exterior of King Edward's School. We did take my cousin inside, but I only took photos outside.

The Royal Coat of Arms above the main entrance to the school.

More buildings to the left, dating to the post war era of the late 1940s or into the 1950s.

On this site they had more land to build the school compared to the old New Street site.

In January 2018, on one of my many walks around the University of Birmingham's Edgbaston Campus I got some new photos of King Edward's School from Edgbaston Park Road. I've not been in the grounds of the school since we had my cousin with us 10 years earlier.

This building is the King Edward's Schools' Foundation Office. You can also access the King Edward VI High School for Girls from here (more on that further below).

Another Royal Coat of Arms above the Foundation building. Clearly the arms of King Edward VI.

There was also a Royal Coat of Arms on the school gate from Edgbaston Park Road.

Another walk around the Edgbaston Campus of the University of Birmingham, this time in February 2019, and I tried to get a couple of photos of King Edward VI High School for Girls. The sunlight was a bit bright from Pritchatts Road. The school was founded in 1883 and was sharing the boys school on New Street. They moved to Congreve Street in 1887 (the former Liberal Club building). In 1896 they moved to a new school building on the site of the Hen & Chickens pub on New Street. They moved to their present location on Edgbaston Park Road in 1940 to new buildings designed by Holland W. Hobbiss. The New Street site was bought by the Prudential Assurance Company and leased for the Odeon cinema.

Royal Coat of Arms on the Girls school building. Same one as the Boys school.

In February 2019, I was able to get this photo from the no 63 bus on the Bristol Road of King Edward's School. The long hedge that was here was cut down and replaced by a fence. You can see the large Rugby field from here. A new sports hall was built in 2018 near Vince House (it was complete by 2019). Not far from here is the Park Vale Gate. I think we drove up here back during the 2008 Sunday morning visit. The Chapel was visible from here to the right.

The modern 21st Century photos were taken by Elliott Brown between 2008 and 2019.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at more than 1,120 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Squares and public spaces
02 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Oozells Square in Brindleyplace

Welcome to Oozells Square at Brindleyplace. It was developed from the late 1990s and the main focus building of the square is the IKON Gallery in the former Oozells Street Board School. The square is surrounded by the following buildings: Six, Seven, Eight and Nine Brindleyplace. With Oozells Street and Cumberland Street linking the square to Broad Street. Sculptures by Paul de Monchaux.

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Oozells Square in Brindleyplace





Welcome to Oozells Square at Brindleyplace. It was developed from the late 1990s and the main focus building of the square is the IKON Gallery in the former Oozells Street Board School. The square is surrounded by the following buildings: Six, Seven, Eight and Nine Brindleyplace. With Oozells Street and Cumberland Street linking the square to Broad Street. Sculptures by Paul de Monchaux.


Oozells Square got it's name from Oozells Street which runs from Broad Street towards Central Square at Brindleyplace. The other road that crosses Oozells Square is Cumberland Street. As well as the IKON Gallery the square features the following buildings: Six Brindleyplace, Seven Brindleyplace, Eight Brindleyplace and Nine Brindleyplace. Mostly offices, but some of the buildings have restaurants at ground level.

 

IKON Gallery

For my IKON Gallery post click this link: From the Oozells Street Boarding School to the IKON Gallery.

I'll keep this brief as I covered the history and see more photos in my IKON Gallery post (link above). Built as the Oozells Street Board School in 1877 by by local architects Martin & Chamberlain, the school opened in 1878. The original tower was demolished in 1976 over safety grounds. It was rebuilt in 1997 as part of the development to fit it out for the Ikon Gallery which opened here in 1998.

The following view was taken in May 2009 on my then mobile phone camera.

Also May 2009 on my then mobile phone camera.

This was a view from June 2009. By then I had my first bridge camera.

Outside of the IKON Gallery in July 2015 was this The Big Hoot owl called Midnight Moths by the artist: Alyn Smith, it was sponsored by: Harrow Green.

In July 2017 outside the IKON Gallery in Oozells Square was this The Big Sleuth bear called The Ink Detective by the artist Mr A Singh and sponsored by Deloitte. The other bear was at the far end of the square (see further down this post for that).

Six Brindleyplace

This building opened in the year 2000. 6 Brindleyplace has 92,000 square feet  of office space. There are several restaurants facing Oozells Square. 

Seen in November 2017 was Cielo Italian. This is from the road between Six and Seven Brindleyplace leading from Central Square.

This view of Cielo Italian from Oozells Square, November 2017.

Christmas tree in Oozells Square, the view towards 6 Brindleyplace and Cielo Italian during December 2018. You can see 2 Brindleyplace and the IKON Gallery from here.

Now onto March 2019 and cherry blossom season on the trees in Oozells Square, as this man sets up a shot on his camera. 6 Brindleyplace seen to the left.

Another cherry blossom shot of 6 Brindleyplace on the same day as above (March 2019). You can see 8 Brindleyplace to the left, and 7 Brindleyplace is in the corner.

The Barry Flanagan sitting hare sculpture seen facing Cielo Italian at 6 Brindleyplace during September 2019. (see another photo further down in the 9 Brindleyplace section). There was an exhibition at the time in the IKON Gallery (which I checked out a week later at the beginning of October 2019).

In November 2019 for this view of a new restaurant at 6 Brindleyplace called Siamaiz Thai Restaurant

Seven Brindleyplace

This office development is between 8 and 6 Brindleyplace. I have never got a direct photo of 7 Brindleyplace from Oozells Square before, so these views below will have to illustrate what it looks like. It was built from 2002 and construction took two years. It has over 85,000 square feet of office space.

In November 2014, there was a mobile crane near 8 Brindleyplace. You can see Cielo Italian from here.

A crop of a cherry blossom tree shot from March 2019, you can see 7 Brindleyplace is to the right of 8 Brindleyplace and to the left of 6 Brindleyplace. Just in the corner.

Eight Brindleyplace

Built in the year 2000, the building provides over 92,000 square feet of office space.

In May 2009, 8 Brindleyplace was occupied by RBS.

Mobile crane in front of 8 Brindleyplace during November 2014. 9 Brindleyplace to the left, and you can see the stone sculptures in the square.

Seen not too far from the outside of 8 Brindleyplace in Oozells Square back in July 2017, was this The Big Sleuth bear called Enlightenment. The artist was Valerie Osment, and the sponsor was Dudley Zoological Gardens

Another mobile crane, early March 2020 (several weeks before lockdown). Was again cherry blossom on the trees in Oozells Square. You can just about see 7 Brindleyplace to the right in the corner (left of 6 Brindleyplace).

Nine Brindleyplace

Built in 1999, between Oozells Street and Cumberland Street (the other side faces Broad Street), 9 Brindleyplace has 26,800 square feet of restaurant space, and 43,000 square feet of office space. Number Nine the Gallery was established by Lee Benson in this building back in 1999. Part of the building became the Oozells Building in 2018.

In January 2018 I saw this sign on 9 Brindleyplace ...

OOh ... something's changing OOZELLS BUILDING

By October 2018, the works to turn this side of 9 Brindleyplace into the Oozells Building appeared to be complete.

By December 2018, there was a Christmas tree outside of the Oozells Building, and the Amazon Treasure Truck was in town again.

In February 2019, I had this view of the Oozells Building at 9 Brindleyplace from down the side of Cielo Italian at 6 Brindleyplace.

In March 2019, it was blossom season again in Oozells Square. Cielo Italian at 6 Brindeyplace to the left, while Piccolino is at 9 Brindleyplace to the right.

Facing Piccolino at 9 Brindleyplace back in September 2019, was this Barry Flanagan hare sculpture, it was there for a few months before it was removed. See my post at the time here Barry Flanagan bronze sculptures at the IKON Gallery.

Christmas tree towards 9 Brindleyplace during December 2019, while it was raining. Jurys Inn and Popworld behind ot the left on Broad Street.

Paul de Monchaux Stone sculptures

The stone sculptures goes from the Cumberland Street end to the Oozells Street end of Oozells Square. Included here is sculpted stone seats and a pagoda designed by Paul de Monchaux. There is a small canal of water that you can cross over.

This view towards the IKON Gallery in May 2009.

This was a June 2009 view of the stone sculpture in Oozells Square, again an IKON Gallery view.

Christmas decorations in December 2019 on the stone sculptures. This was from the IKON Gallery end toward 8 Brindleyplace and it was a bit wet. Fairy lights from one end to the other.

From this end you can see the main stone sculpture, looking a bit wet, towards the IKON Gallery. Piccolino restaurant at 9 Brindleyplace to the right.

There has been the odd event here in the past such as 4 Squares Weekender, but will leave those to another Oozells Square post in the future.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at over 1,120 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
27 Apr 2020 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - March & April (2020) update

An average of 17 glass panels a day will be fitted onto this new, 26-storey, Birmingham landmark. This update shows the progress made on site in March and April, with the structural steelwork superstructure continuing its upward rise, closely followed by the beautiful glazing facade. Already a new Birmingham Gem!

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The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - March & April (2020) update





An average of 17 glass panels a day will be fitted onto this new, 26-storey, Birmingham landmark. This update shows the progress made on site in March and April, with the structural steelwork superstructure continuing its upward rise, closely followed by the beautiful glazing facade. Already a new Birmingham Gem!


Gallery of 103 Colmore Row photography by Daniel Sturley, one of the People with Passion at It's Your Build and Birmingham We Are.

Photography taken during April 2020

Photography taken during March 2020

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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70 passion points
Construction & regeneration
16 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Cube from the last year of construction in 2009 till it was completed in 2010

I only started taking photos around Birmingham in 2009, so didn't get my first close up photos of The Cube until the summer of 2009. On and off I got the odd photo update. Then in 2010 when it was getting close to completion I took more photos of it. The Lovely People statues were installed by the end of 2010. This year The Cube is getting close to it's 10th anniversary.

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The Cube from the last year of construction in 2009 till it was completed in 2010





I only started taking photos around Birmingham in 2009, so didn't get my first close up photos of The Cube until the summer of 2009. On and off I got the odd photo update. Then in 2010 when it was getting close to completion I took more photos of it. The Lovely People statues were installed by the end of 2010. This year The Cube is getting close to it's 10th anniversary.


The Cube

The Cube was built between 2007 and 2010. The architect was Ken Shuttleworth of Make Architects. It should have been completed by 2008 but got delayed until 2010. Located near The Mailbox alongside the Worcester & Birmingham Canal on Commercial Street and near Washington Wharf.

 

2009

Indirect views of the construction of The Cube taken during April 2009 from Gas Street Basin. These are crops of the original photos. So you have the bridge near the Tap & Spile.

The narrowboats at Worcester Bar, and the buildings behind were derelict.

Views from June 2009. From the Worcester & Birmingham Canal towards the Salvage Turn Bridge.

Towards The Mailbox.

From The Mailbox.

The view from Brindleyplace along Oozells Street from Oozells Square (beyond Broad Street and down Berkley Street).

In October 2009 from Digbeth, The Cube on the Skyline behind The Sentinels, and to the left of the Beetham Tower and Centre City Tower. The Custard Factory (Devonshire House) is to the right.

December 2009 at The Mailbox (I was there for a work Christmas Party). Nightshots. Cladding of The Cube almost done apart from the Crown.

Views of The Cube down Bridge Street. Cladding on the side facing Premier Inn was not quite done.

Buildings on the left on the Arena Central site would not be demolished until 2015. Was an old hospital (I think).

2010

Heading to February 2010, this view was between Baskerville House and the site of the Library of Birmingham. Cladding around The Cube looked done, but the Crown still hadn't had glass panels installed. The old Municipal Bank below.

From Cambridge Street past the Library of Birmingham site. This end of The REP was going to be demolished before the library was built. Could see The Cube to the left. If you stand here today, you will not be able to See The Cube (unless you go up to the Discovery Terrace or Secret Garden).

A few more views of The Cube from Bridge Street with a Victorian style lamppost. Looks like a gas lit one (but probably has light bulbs).

May 2010 and they had finally put up the glass panels on the Crown of The Cube. Views from The Mailbox.

The Highways Agency would become one of the first tenants at The Cube.

This view over the future Arena Central site behind Centenary Plaza. This was a view from Centenary Square near the Hall of Memory.

June 2010 and my first views of The Cube now more or less complete from Highgate Park and on the skyline with The Sentinels and Beetham Tower.

Views from Bristol Street. Buildings that were on Holloway Head. So not far from Holloway Circus.

July 2010 and some more views of The Cube from The Mailbox.

The Cube from Gas Street Basin, now complete.

December 2010 and my first interior photos of The Cube. Mainly to see the Lovely People statues.

The Lovely People by Temper.

Urban

Positioned as though welcoming guests to The Cube, ‘Urban’ represents the difficulties of facing of adversity, as well as the triumphs of overcoming these to create a better life.
Inspiration: Lee Fortnam, who faced troubles throughout his early life, but with the help of The Prince’s Trust went on to begin a successful career as a Corgi registered gas and plumbing engineer – later becoming an ambassador for the charity.

Mother & Child

The only pair of figures within the collection, ‘Mother and Child’ can be found on Level 7, sharing the unparalleled bond between a mother and her children.
Inspiration: Ellie-Mae, who was born in with a hole in her heart, and Rachel, who had no choice but to leave her daughter in the capable hands of the staff at Birmingham Children’s Hospital.

Uplifted

Suspended high within the atrium, ‘Uplifted’ tells the story of bravery and self-sacrifice of those who help people in need. The sculpture was designed to show a person holding on to the balloon preparing for life’s ride.
Inspiration: Firefighter Dave Burns of the West Midlands Fire Service who, in 1992, entered a 20-storey building to rescue two colleagues from a floor engulfed in flames. Burns was later awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II.

Working Man

Found on Level 5, ‘The Working Man’ is sat on a bench reading a newspaper, representative of people who work to provide for their family and put a roof over their head.
Inspiration: Birmingham-born Barry O’Neil who turned the notion of ‘nine-to-five’ into something much more heroic. Having worked for some of the West Midlands greatest manufacturers, including JCB and MG Rover, O’Neil proved there is no pursuit more honest or dignified.

Persuit

Tucked within the office spaces on Level 8 you’ll find ‘Pursuit’, representing Birmingham’s entrepreneurial heritage and the legacy it holds to this day.
Inspiration: Paul Bassi, businessman and first Asian president of the Chamber of Commerce, recognised for his contribution to business and the economy, as well as his selflessness.

Survivor

An addition to Level 6, ‘Survivor’ reflects the perseverance and bravery of people when faced with times of crisis.
Inspiration: Holocaust survivor, Gerda Cavangh, who escaped Vienna, trekked across Europe and arrived in England as a stowaway. Born into a Jewish family in Austria, Cavangh’s mother encouraged her to flee the country. Once in England, she worked as a medical orderly in the Auxiliary Territorial Services, receiving two service medals for her work.

I've taken more views of The Cube since then from 2011 until earlier in 2020 on and off, but will leave those photos for another post maybe.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,110 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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