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ArchitectureAndUs – A FreeTimePays community

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Architecture and Us is all about sharing and promoting great architecture and providing a shared digital space where people can make a difference and have a positive social impact.

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Modern Architecture
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Are you passionate about Architecture? Join Us!

ArchitectureAndUs is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Architecture and connect with people who share their passion.

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Are you passionate about Architecture? Join Us!





ArchitectureAndUs is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Architecture and connect with people who share their passion.


ArchitectureAndUs is all about engaging people in the promotion of architecture and the recognition that our buildings are there for us all to enjoy and appreciate.

ArchitectureAndUs is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

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80 passion points
Modern Architecture
05 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

From The NIA Birmingham to Utilita Arena Birmingham

The National Indoor Arena opened in Birmingham in 1991 on a site close to Old Turn Junction of the Birmingham Canal Navigations. Rebuilt on the canalside from 2013-14, it was branded Barclaycard Arena from 2014-17. Then Arena Birmingham from 2017-20. It now has a new sponsor and is called Utilita Arena Birmingham. Still owned by the NEC Group.

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From The NIA Birmingham to Utilita Arena Birmingham





The National Indoor Arena opened in Birmingham in 1991 on a site close to Old Turn Junction of the Birmingham Canal Navigations. Rebuilt on the canalside from 2013-14, it was branded Barclaycard Arena from 2014-17. Then Arena Birmingham from 2017-20. It now has a new sponsor and is called Utilita Arena Birmingham. Still owned by the NEC Group.


The National Indoor Arena Birmingham

The National Indoor Arena was opened in 1991. It was where Gladiators was recorded from 1992 to 1999. Located near King Edwards Road in Birmingham. It is on the Birmingham Canal Navigations at Old Turn Junction, where the Main Line meets the start of the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. The arena was redeveloped during 2013 and 2014. Reopening in December 2014 at the Barclaycard Arena. This sponsorship ended at the end of August 2017. And it was then known as Arena Birmingham from September 2017. Securing a new sponsor in 2020, the arena was renamed again in April 2020 (during the lockdown while they were closed) to the current Utilita Arena Birmingham.

 

The NIA Birmingham (1991-2014)

Events that took place at the National Indoor Arena during this time include Gladiators (1992-99), the Eurovision Song Contest 1998, and the World Indoor Athletics Championships 2003.

My earliest photos of the NIA were taken during April 2009. By which time they were branding it as the nia birmingham. These views from the Brindleyplace Bridge towards The Malt House and the Brewmasters Bridge.

This view of the nia birmingham taken during June 2009, from the towpath outside of the National Sealife Centre.

NIA redevelopment (2013-14)

The redevelopment started around the summer of 2013 and was completed by the winter of 2014. The arena reopened as the Barclaycard Arena from December 2014.

Scaffolding going up around August 2013. The arena remained open throughout the works, but access to the public was limited.

More hoardings going up around September 2013. The old canalside facade was starting to be dismantled.

When the Library of Birmingham opened during September 2013 for the first time, I was able to get this photo of The NIA from the Secret Garden.

By April 2014 the steel girders had gone up and the shape of the new canalside view of the Arena was already up.

Not long to go by September 2014. The golden fins were in place, as was the glass windows and the three sky needles in the middle.

The Secret Garden view from the Library of Birmingham update taken during Sepember 2014 of the Arena. When the view is clear, you can see Edgbaston Reservoir from here.

The November 2014 update from the Brindleyplace Bridge. Within a month the arena would reopen as the Barclaycard Arena, but was more or less complete by this point.

Barclaycard Arena (2014-17)

The Arena reopened on the 2nd December 2014 as the Barclaycard Arena.

In the middle of December 2014, I took the following nightshots to see the Barclaycard Arena lit up after dark. This was around 5pm. It looked amazing. Including the digital display of the then City Skyline.

In January 2015 I took this digital display on the Barclaycard Arena. First view "lighting up Birmingham's skyline". The second view the Barclaycard Arena logo with the skyline.

In March 2015 I took this view of the Barclaycard Arena from the Secret Garden at the Library of Birmingham.

A May 2015 view of the Barclaycard Arena with it's golden fins.

Arena Birmingham (2017-20)

Barclaycard ended there sponsorship of the arena at the end of August 2017. So from September 2017, the arena was now known simply as Arena Birmingham (but with no sponsor).

Took this view of Arena Birmingham from the Secret Garden at the Library of Birmingham during October 2017.

The Beast from the East and Storm Emma hit Birmingham during early March 2018. Which was when Arena Birmingham was hosting the World Indoor Athletics Championships 2018. But the surrounding canals and towpaths were covered in snow and ice! Athletes and officials could run around outside, but it would have been very cold.

In April 2018, I saw the then new Arena Birmingham logo heading up the steps from the King Edwards Road entrance. Canopies were also at the time going up around The Malt House for an event linking the Arena to The ICC.

My last views of Arena Birmingham before the lockdown and the new sponsor Utilita came into force were taken during January 2020. It would be another 6 to 7 months before I would see the arena again (due to the pandemic / lockdown).

Utilita Arena Birmingham (2020-?)

During the lockdown, the arena had to close (like other venues all around the world).  The name change took place during April 2020. And would now be called Utilita Arena Birmingham. That meant the signs had to be changed, and the old ones taken down.

My first photo of Utilita Arena Birmingham taken in the middle of July 2020 from the Brindleyplace Bridge. The rest near the end of the month.

Hopefully it will one day be safe to reopen indoor arenas like this one. Even for sporting events without crowds. And they could be televised.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

 

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80 passion points
History & heritage
28 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Shakespeare Memorial Room at the Library of Birmingham

Since September 2013, the Shakespeare Memorial Room has been located on Level 9 at the Library of Birmingham (near the Skyline Viewpoint). Did you know that it was orginally built in 1882 to house the Shakespeare Library and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain. It was later dismantled and placed in the 1974 Central Library in the School of Music Complex, before it was moved again.

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The Shakespeare Memorial Room at the Library of Birmingham





Since September 2013, the Shakespeare Memorial Room has been located on Level 9 at the Library of Birmingham (near the Skyline Viewpoint). Did you know that it was orginally built in 1882 to house the Shakespeare Library and was designed by John Henry Chamberlain. It was later dismantled and placed in the 1974 Central Library in the School of Music Complex, before it was moved again.


The Shakespeare Memorial Room

On the 28th September 2013, I returned to the Library of Birmingham for my second visit. Also to go up to the floors that I had no time for the first time around. I went up the lift. Some lifts only go has far as Level 7, so you need the lift to Level 9. This would take you to the Skyline Viewpoint and to the Shakespeare Memorial Room. Or you can walk up the stairs.

In the first month of being open, the library was very busy and full of tourists, including many from overseas, so it was packed! There was a lot of people in the Shakespeare Memorial Room on my first visit. Although in the years since, I've had the room to myself.

Click here for my last post on the Library of Birmingham for an interior tour.

Now located inside of the Golden Cylinder at the top of the Library (looks like a Nescafe Gold Blend coffee jar lid).

The Birmingham Shakespeare Memorial Library was founded by George Dawson and some of his closest friends, as they decided that Birmingham should be the home of the greatest collection of Shakespeare's books in the world. They insisted that a room be built for them, and that it should be free and open to everyone.

It was originally created for the much loved (and missed) Victorian Central Library (opened in 1882 and demolished in 1974). The first Central Library of the Victorian era was built in 1866 but was partially destroyed by a fire in 1879. John Henry Chamberlain was given the task to re-build the Library and this included a room to house Birmingham's Shakespeare Library.

Sir Barry Jackson, the founder of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in 1913, later became a Director of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon during the late 1940s. There is a gavel given to him in 1936 in the room.

The next Central Library was designed by John Madin and was built from 1969 until 1974. The Shakespeare Memorial Room was dismantled from the old Victorian library and put back together like a jigsaw puzzle. Being placed in what was the School of Music complex. Which included Adrian Boult Hall and the Birmingham Conservatoire. This included the Library Theatre Birmingham and the William Shakespeare Memorial Library and the Library Exhibition Hall.

It remained there until it was moved to the new Library of Birmingham in 2013 (built from 2010 until 2013).

The roof was reconstructed by in plaster by A E Edwards & Co, a Birmingham based company dating to the 1870s.

I'd only ever got close to the outside of the old complex (during 2011), so never stepped foot in the room until it reopened at the Library of Birmingham in 2013.

 

View of the Library Theatre Birmingham on the 2nd January 2011. This concrete bridge was in front of Woktastic. There was also an entrance to Adrian Boult Hall at the time.

What was the entrance to the William Shakespeare Memorial Library and Library Exhibition Hall. I never went in. Wasn't sure if I could open the doors as they were self locking doors. After the last Central Library closed down for good in 2013, I had to wait for the new Library to open before I could see the room for myself for the first time.

On the 31st August 2013, I was getting my last views of the Library of Birmingham before it opened to the public in Centenary Square 3 days later on the 3rd September 2013. This view of the golden cylinder seen from Suffolk Street Queensway. The windows at the front is the Skyline Viewpoint and the Shakespeare Memorial Room is behind that.

On the 21st September 2013 during my first visit to the inside of the Library of Birmingham I took the photo below. At the top of the library on Level 9 is the Shakespeare Memorial Room inside of the Golden Cylinder. Below on Level 7 is the Secret Garden. The view was from the Birmingham Canal Navigations Main Line (near the Turnover Bridge No. 2 close to what was at that point called the National Indoor Arena). Overlooking the ICC Energy Centre.

On the 28th September 2013, arriving at the Shakespeare Memorial Room on Level 9 for the first time. There was a lot of people in there.

Looking up at the ceiling. It is remarkable that this has survived since the late 19th century (unless it is a recreation).

Looking to the wooden panelling on one side of the room.

It more or less looks the same to the right.

And to the left near the door.

One of the corners with the bookcases.

Looking down at the doors of the lower cabinets.

Looking up to the ceiling to the ornate detailing at the top.

Out of the door, and there was comfy red sofas at the Skyline Viewpoint.

Ornate glass windows in the upper cabinet doors.

The views outside the room are spectacular. There is also a couple of busts and plaques / tablets, including ones saved from the old Central Libraries. If the lifts are busy walk down the stairs (if you can).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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70 passion points
Construction & regeneration
27 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Newhall Square: From the Elkington Electroplating Works and Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry to The Whitmore Collection

It has been over 20 years since the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street closed for good. Since then the site has been the development site called Newhall Square. With hotels and apartments around a square, near the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. Heritage buildings have been fully restored and incorporated into the development.

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Newhall Square: From the Elkington Electroplating Works and Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry to The Whitmore Collection





It has been over 20 years since the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street closed for good. Since then the site has been the development site called Newhall Square. With hotels and apartments around a square, near the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. Heritage buildings have been fully restored and incorporated into the development.


Newhall Square

Newhall Square is located on Newhall Street in the Jewellery Quarter. Between Fleet Street and Charlotte Street. On one side is the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. It was historically the site of the Elkington Silver Electroplating Works from 1838. Built opposite of the Birmingham Assay Office, it was the 19th century silver electroplating factory of George Elkington. The much larger premises was mostly demolished in the mid 1960s. To the back was the Whitmore Arm (also known as Miss Colmore's Arm) (this is now filled in) and the Whitmore Warehouse (which survives to this day).

The Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry was located in the buildings at 144 Newhall Street from 1951 until it closed for good in 1997 (most but not all of the contents moved to Thinktank which opened at Millennium Point in Eastside during 2001). It was the home for the last 50 years of the 20th Century of the 1797 Smethwick Engine, and the City of Birmingham locomotive (which was moved out in the year 2000).

144 Newhall Street has been a Grade II listed building since 2004. Today it is addressed as 2 Newhall Square, and is now home to Glancy Nicholls Architects, who are based in The Engine Room to the rear.

Whitmore Warehouse to the back of Newhall Square was also given a Grade II listed building status in 2004. It dates to the mid 19th century. It was formerly part of the museum complex, and before that part of the Elkington Works.

The mid to late 20th century museum buildings were demolished in 2006 for a project called the Jewellery Box. This was probably later renamed to Newhall Square.

The Travelodge hotel along Charlotte Street was open by the late 2000s. It wouldn't be until 2014 before construction would begin on what would become Staycity ApartHotels. This is also on Charlotte Street and faces the canal as well. It opened in 2016. The final phase to complete Newhall Square didn't start until 2018. This would be The Whitmore Collection, including the restoration of the old Whitmore Warehouse. Finally being complete during 2020. Some 23 years after the museum closed down. But some 14 years since the land clearance began.

 

2009

I started taking photos of Newhall Square in April 2009. And continued getting the occasional update for the next 11 years. First views over the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal where there is a viewpoint area from Newhall Street. Islington Gates which is to the left of the canal was already built by this point. View to the remains of the Whitmore Warehouse.

To the right you can see the Travelodge hotel and the back of The Engine Room at 144 Newhall Street.

The locks on the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal near Newhall Street. There used to be steps that went down to the canal from here. The Islington Gates development seen to the left of the canal.

In November 2009 I got my first photos of 144 Newhall Street. Which was the former Elkington Electroplating Works. On this building was a blue plaque from the Birmingham City Society (unveiled in 2004) about Alexander Parkes (1813-1890), who was the inventor of the first plastic. He worked for the Elkington, Mason & Company Electroplaters here from about 1840 until 1850.

This building on the left used to be the former entrance to the Museum of Science & Industry. It too has a blue plaque. This one from English Heritage about George Elkington who was a promotor of Electro-plating at his works on this site.

View of both buildings that used be the main entrance to the Elkington Electroplating Works. To the far right on the corner of Newhall Street and Charlotte Street is The Queens Arms public house.

2011

Not too many changes during July 2011, other than Newhall Square had hoardings up and offices To Let or For Sale.

The wasteland was being used as a car park at this point.

Would be years before another development began at Newhall Square.

Gates to the Newhall Square site from Newhall Street. Probably for staff only.

For some reason they had painted this building yellow. Even the hoardings covering the door.

2013

Now onto June 2013. Some demolition rubble spotted from the towpath of the canal not far from the Travelodge hotel.

They had now tarmaced the wasteland.

2014

By September 2014, construction was finally under way for the next phase, which would become the  Staycity ApartHotels.

By December 2014 the hotel construction was going on behind Whitmore Warehouse.

You could also see it from Newhall Street. The canal and Islington Gates are to the left. Travelodge to the far right.

2015

Just a couple of updates during 2015. In January 2015 the hotel was still under scaffolding.

By November 2015 it was nearing completion.

2016

In January 2016 the new Staycity ApartHotels building was complete. As seen from this canal view from the footbridge close to Fleet Street.

By April 2016 the Staycity ApartHotels was open. View down on Charlotte Street.

Some of the yellow signs of the Staycity ApartHotels on Charlotte Street.

Next to the Staycity ApartHotels on Charlotte Street ws a temporary car park.

You could also see it down the canal from the Saturday Bridge on Parade.

2017

A tempoary car park was at Newhall Square during January 2017. Behind is Glancy Nicholls Architects at The Engine Room. At the time the Ormiston Academies Trust was using 144 Newhall Street as Ormiston House.

View from the canal towpath towards the Travelodge hotel.

This would be the last year without construction activity on this site.

2018

Signs of activity at Newhall Square during January 2018. Associated Architects had designed a mixed-use development of purpose-built apartments for private rent.

This space would be built on and would complete the square within 2 and a half years.

By April 2018 construction had started on what would be called The Whitmore Collection. The view from the canal footbridge near Fleet Street.

Digging the foundations. The Newhall Street canal entrance / exit would be sealed off, meaning you would have to get onto the canal from other entrances. Also this old wall would eventually be replaced / go.

By June 2018 the steel girders were flying up.

In July 2018 the steel girders were visible from the Library of Birmingham at the Secret Garden.

2019

My last update before the lockdown was back in November 2019. View over the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal from Fleet Street. Staycity ApartHotels is to the left and The Whitmore Collection to the right.

On Newhall Street the building was at full height under scaffolding. It was being built by Winvic.

You can see The Whitmore Collection surrounding what used to be 144 Newhall Street (now 2 Newhall Square). The building with the George Elkington blue plaque was still painted yellow at the time. The building would have a Residents' Clubhouse, Free coffee and WiFi when complete.

2020

During the 4 long months of lockdown, Newhall Square was completed. And I was aware of it being complete and open by the summer. I was only able to travel into town in July 2020. I walked down Newhall Street and headed onto the new path alongside the canal.

This is the new entrance to the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal from Newhall Street. Much more appealing than the dark steps that used to be there before.

Could already see that the Whitmore Warehouse was finally restored, probably into apartments.

There is two sets of water features here with water jet fountains. Approximately near where the old Whitmore Canal Arm used to be in the 19th century.

Whitmore Warehouse hasn't looked this good since it was last used as part of the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry. I think it was in here that the working Smethwick Engine used to be (now working at Thinktank).

First proper look into the square. Glancy Nicholls Architects are in The Engine House. To think 25 years ago this was part of the museum complex. Travelodge to the left.

I have memories of visiting the museum back in the 1990s and could not imagine it looking like this now. Wish I had a camera with me back then (if only a film one).

Heading out of Newhall Square past The Engine Room.

The exit to Newhall Street. Directly opposite is 141 Newhall Street.

Back onto Newhall Street, you can see how The Whitmore Collection was built onto Islington Gates at 110 Newhall Street. It makes a pleasing entrance to the canal. Lets hope the area is kept clean and litter free.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
History & heritage
03 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Outside the main entrance of the Black Country Living Museum

We continue our digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum through my photos taken on a visit from August 2011 (almost 9 years ago). With a look at the buildings outside of the main entrance. The Rolfe Street Baths from Smethwick. Also a building from Wednesbury. A replica Titanic anchor was outside the museum back then. Also a Chassis Press.

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Outside the main entrance of the Black Country Living Museum





We continue our digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum through my photos taken on a visit from August 2011 (almost 9 years ago). With a look at the buildings outside of the main entrance. The Rolfe Street Baths from Smethwick. Also a building from Wednesbury. A replica Titanic anchor was outside the museum back then. Also a Chassis Press.


In this second digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum, we look at the buildings that were rebuilt at the main entrance of the museum, and now used as exhibition rooms. There was also a Chassis Press outside of the museum that you can see from Tipton Road in Dudley. During my visit of August 2011, there was also a replica Titanic anchor, based on one originally made by Hingley at Netherton in the Black Country (this is no longer there). It was made in 2010 for a Channel 4 documentary and was on loan to Dudley Council at the time.

Rolfe Street Baths, Smethwick

A look at the Rolfe Street Baths. Originally built on Rolfe Street in Smethwick in 1888. The building was a striking example of the Arts and Crafts movement of the period. The building closed down and was dismantled brick by brick in 1989. Later to be rebuilt at the Black Country Living Museum in 1999. The original architects was Harris, Martin & Harris of Birmingham. The baths was originally built by the Smethwick Local Board of Health to provide washing and recreational facilities. These days the building at the museum houses the Museum's reception and exhibition galleries.

In 2011 you could see the replica Titanic anchor outside of the Rolfe Street Baths (more on that further down the post).

What looks like a ghost sign painted on the side of the building reads:

ROLFE STREET

BATHS

FIRST BUILT IN SMETHWICK 1888

First look at the façade of the Rolfe Street Baths. It is a striking example of late 19th century architecture. It has ornamental brickwork and terracotta panels.

The terracotta panels has false gables on the façade depicting fish, herons and wildlife rarely seen in the industrial surroundings that the building was once in.

The building has decorative cast iron arches and columns which support the roof in the pool hall (best seen from the inside).

Remarkably the building had surviving being dismantled from Smethwick and re-erected here in Dudley. It's hard to tell that the building wasn't originally at this location.

The former entrances to the Female and Male baths. The building used to have 2 swimming pools with 28 slip baths, 2 showers and a munipical laundry.

These green doors are probablt no longer in use, but were retained for decorative use only. You can see some bricks that don't exactly match the originals. Perhaps some were broken or missing, and they had to use new bricks in the restoration at the museum.

Façade from a factory in Wednesbury

This was a façade from a building originally built as a factory in Wednesbury. It was moved to the museum by the West Midlands County Council Task Force. It was opened at the museum by H.R.H. The Duke of Gloucester on the 24th October 1985. Finance for the building was provided by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council and the then West Midlands County Council (abolished in 1986). This is now the Pre-Paid Ticket Entrance. There is also a door for disabled or elderly people in wheelchairs to use. And they can get access to their coach nearby.

In the middle of this building was an anchor.

Inside was this plaque that was unveiled back in 1985 by the Duke of Gloucester.

The Titanic Anchor

Something you won't see on your visit to the museum now is this replica of The Titanic Anchor. It was made in 2010 by Sheffield Forgemasters International Ltd for a Channel 4 documentary. It was on loan at the time to the museum from Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council.

The original anchor was made by N. Hingley & Sons Ltd in 1911 at their factory in Netheron, Dudley. The original anchor weighed 15.5 tons.

In 2011 the Titanic anchor replica was seen outside of the Black Country Living Museum near the former Rolfe Street Baths building. But it was eventually moved to a more permenant location in Netherton where it remains today.

One of the museum volunteers seen in period costume close to the main entrance of the museum, not far from the Titanic Anchor replica. The anchor is now lying face down in Netherton.

Wilkins & Mitchell Chassis Press

Probably the first thing you would see when arriving at the museum on Tipton Road would be this Chassis Press. The  Wilkins & Mitchell Chassis Press was built in 1913 for Rubery Owen Ltd based in Darlaston at the time. It was erected and maintained by The Hulbert Group of Dudley. Wilkins and Mitchell Limited was established in 1904 in Darlaston. They produced machine tools and presses. Their machines could be found in factories all around the world. The Chassis Press here was in use until 1970. It's possible that it could have been installed at the museum site from 1978, or in the 1980s.

A close up look at the Chassis Press. Four gear wheels at the back and two large gear wheels at the front.

There was so many gear wheels here that used to turn when it use. You can also see a smaller gear wheel in front of the larger ones.

It's now just a monument that you would see as you arrive or leave the Black Country Living Museum. A reminder of how successful it was when in use from 1913 to 1970 in Darlaston.

Side view of the Chassis Press with the gear wheels.

On this side you can see four gear wheels at the bottom.

Clearly this wheel used to drive the gear wheels.

One last look at the Chassis Press before getting back in our coach and returning to Birmingham,

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points

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