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YourPlaceYourSpace Construction & regeneration
30 Jul 2021 - YourPlaceYourSpace
Introducing

Introducing 'Map and Track' from It's Your Build

‘We’re all about connecting People and Community with Place, Construction and great Architecture for maximum Social Impact’

Take the post for details on 'Map and Track'.

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Introducing 'Map and Track' from It's Your Build





‘We’re all about connecting People and Community with Place, Construction and great Architecture for maximum Social Impact’

Take the post for details on 'Map and Track'.


“Map & Track” is a community engagement package run on several on-line communities powered by digital tech specialists, Your Place Your Space. 

This is all part of a digital drive to connect more communities with their built environment and connect more developers, construction companies and architects with people who live and work in the places where they are building.

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Social impact and the way the industry and its members can demonstrate the social value to the community resulting from the build is shaping many decisions today. “Map and Track” is all about building community connections that drive social value and create even greater social impact for the benefit of all.

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Why Birmingham? Why the built environment?

Birmingham is a City undergoing huge change.  People want to know what’s up, what’s going up and what’s in the stage of being planned. 

There is an increasing number of people in Birmingham who enjoy modern architecture and love to follow the builds as they take shape. These are all people who, through their passion, enthusiasm and interest, can play an important role in shaping the future for the industry and encourage others to get involved.

Birmingham was an obvious place to launch our first digital space for connecting community with construction and construction with community.

“Map & Track” gives developers, architects and construction companies an effective way to engage and connect with people with shared values and it gives community an effective way of getting involved.

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Over 100,000 people now follow a Your Place Your Space community and our built environment sites and associated maps are now regular visited by people as a source of information, ideas and even inspiration. That’s just for Birmingham!

Starting with Birmingham, we have set up multiple accounts on traditional social media channels and this drives our huge and growing following.  For example, visit the largest twitter account of its type at https://twitter.com/BirminghamWeAre and our new dedicated account for builds at https://twitter.com/BuildsWeAre

We are currently rolling out a number of dedicated domains powered by Your Place Your Space digital technology on which will sit our ‘Map and Track’ application.

dndimg alt="" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Construction of 3 Arena Central..jpg" style="width: 50%;" />

www.ItsyourBuild.com

covering the built environment as a passion.

dndimg alt="" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/IMG_5137b_003.jpg" style="width: 50%;" />

www.BirminghamWeAre.com

covering the built environment as one of over 20 passions.

dndimg alt="" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/victoria 0706.jpg" style="width: 50%;" />

www.ArchitectureAndUs.com

early in design but will feature builds of architectural value to Birmingham.

All of the above are featuring projects that use “Map and Track”.

Costs

“Map & Track” will ensure that information about your company, your property and your values (as well as links to contacts and websites) reaches more people and helps attract and grow a large following for you and your builds.

Costs start at £650 per annum per property featured (discounted for multiple properties) and your brand will appear prominently with every property featured.

Step by step, this is how it works!

Step 1

JOIN our community as an individual and/or organisation.

First, we’ll get you and your organisation listed at ItsYourBuild and other communities as appropriate.

Register HERE.

Step 2

We’ll SET UP your build(s) and project(s) for all followers to see.

This could be a new build, an existing property, an example of great architecture, or a feature you’d like to run with community contributors such as a photography tour, a ‘did you know’ series, a topic for a survey or a debate.

Select your interest and tell us more HERE

If it’s a new build, then our team may already be featuring it at It's your build and we can move forward several steps, attach your branding and engage our followers in the build.

Step 3

MAP the project.

If the project relates to a new or existing build where the application process has been followed, then it should already be included on our Map. If not, it will now be added.

We will now create a site view with a link to take viewers and followers to your property on the map.

Step 4

Add your BRAND.

In partnership with yourselves, we will now ensure your brand is attached to the project. These images, such as the company logo, will subsequently appear on all posts and all material that you sign off prior to it being published.

Add the brands and images you want to see here and promote the project partnership, collaboration and any community links.

Step 5

We’ll create the first POST with links to your PROJECT.

The first introductory post will tell viewers about the project. We’ll do all the work and we will inform you at all stages.

If the project is to tell people about a build, then we would suggest this includes all content that will help promote the build and the organisations involved, the developer, the architect and the contractor. Let’s include those great artist’s impressions as well.

Step 6

Publish through all appropriate channels.

You’ll be given complete digital access to all content via the YourPlaceYourSpace unique Community Workspace, so you can be involved as much or as little as you wish in the creation of posts.

Once you’re happy, we’ll publish and link the post and article to all social media and direct message accounts for maximum exposure.

We’re now up and running and connected to community!

From here, we can discuss your on-going needs and support your community engagement in whatever way you require. 

All for £650 per annum, we’ll add and create ...

Photos, videos, etc building a huge bank of useful and informative content.

Images and build your gallery with the support of our contributors.

Web and URL links to content of your choice.

Multiple posts to drive social media coverage.

Regular content for inclusion in our e-news.

We can also discuss with you ...

Inviting our community contributors to actively participate.

Opening up photo opportunities and visits for creative contributors to attend.

Engaging our community in surveys, polls and discussions.

There is so much we can offer and so many ways we can engage community.

 

For further details and discuss your requirements:

Jonathan Bostock, ItsyourBuild co-ordinator for FreeTimePays

e: jonathan.bostock@yourplaceyourspace.net

t: 0121 410 5520

m: 07432 637322

It'sYourBuild

‘We’re all about connecting People and Community with Place, Construction and great Architecture for maximum Social Impact’

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50 passion points
Elliott Brown Modern Architecture
26 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Pink artwork Selfridges - mid April to late July 2021 update

After more than 9 months, the pink artwork called 'Dogtooth Flower' designed by Osman Yousefzada is now complete. It completely wraps around Selfridges on Park Street and Moor Street. Now the work to remove the discs underneath can begin. This gallery update featuring photos taken from the 17th April until 25th July 2021, at various locations around the City Centre.

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Pink artwork Selfridges - mid April to late July 2021 update





After more than 9 months, the pink artwork called 'Dogtooth Flower' designed by Osman Yousefzada is now complete. It completely wraps around Selfridges on Park Street and Moor Street. Now the work to remove the discs underneath can begin. This gallery update featuring photos taken from the 17th April until 25th July 2021, at various locations around the City Centre.


For the previous post go here: Osman Yousefzada's Dogtooth Flower at Selfridges

 

17th April 2021

Only a partial bit of pink artwork spotted on the Park Street side of Selfridges. Taken from the Digbeth Branch Canal in Eastside, near Curzon Street, overlooking the HS2 station site.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 17042021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

This view below taken in Digbeth from Milk Street, looking up Coventry Street, with the Rotunda seen above. Below is Moor Street Car Park.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 17042021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

This Digbeth view taken from Birchall Street, looking up Stone Yard, towards Birmingham Coach Station, near the Connaught Square development site.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 17042021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

27th May 2021

West Midlands Cycle Hire docking point seen on Park Street, opposite Selfridges. After this I went up the lift in Moor Street Car Park for the first time in ages.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM Cycle Hire BCC 27052021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The view from level 8 of Moor Street Car Park. The Park Street side of Selfridges.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 27052021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Looking right towards the Parametric Bridge that connects Moor Street Car Park to Selfridges.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 27052021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The view of Selfridges down Park Street, taken from the Parametric Bridge. The gaps have been filled in, so you can't really get your lens through much.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 27052021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

29th May 2021

A couple of days later and the standard view of Selfridges from the corner of Park Street and Moor Street. About halfway up, but yet to go over the top of the Parametric Bridge.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Selfridges 29052021.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

5th June 2021

The views heading down from St Martin's Walk into St Martin's Square at the Bullring & Grand Central Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The screen on for the French Open, was still there for Wimbledon, and for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Vietnamese Street Kitchen is now open, where Handmade Burger Co used to be.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Selfridges near the entrance of Bullring Car Park, on Park Street.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The usual view from the Park Street and Moor Street corner, close to the entrance of Moor Street Car Park.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading up Moor Street to Birmingham Moor Street Station, several NXWM Platinum buses waiting opposite on the 50 (or 35).

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The view of Selfridges from Birmingham Moor Street Station with the Chiltern Railways 168214 train waiting at platform 3. Rotunda on the right.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Now on platform 1 waiting to catch a train home, saw this view of the station with the Parametric Bridge. Still a long way to go at this point

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/DFT Selfridges BR 05062021 (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

13th June 2021

The view from Barford Street and Sherlock Street over the Smithfield development site. Near Southside. Pershore Street Car Park was getting demolished, Moat Lane Car Park is next for demolition.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges Sfield 13062021.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

21st June 2021

Blossom Bar was coming to the Bullring above St Martin's Square. Can barely see Selfridges from here.

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It was open by the time we went into July.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blossom Bar St MS (Jun 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

4th July 2021

Ominious clouds above Selfridges from the usual Moor Street and Park Street corner view. I was walking to the Custard Factory in Digbeth. This was the last photo I took before it started heavily raining while in Digbeth (and I got drenched).

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 04072021.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

19th July 2021

The view from Moor Street Queensway, bus stop MS4. A bus advertising the new Warner Bros / DC movie The Suicide Squad passes Birmingham Moor Street Station, the view of Selfridges on Moor Street.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bham Moor St pin Sfridges 19072021.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

20th July 2021

On the no 50 NXWM Platinum bus heading towards the Bullring. This view of Selfridges, taken from the skyline view on Moseley Road, between Highgate and Digbeth. This view might be lost in the future, if the proposed building between Moseley Street and Cheapside gets built up here.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges Mos Rd Dbth 20072021.JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The 50 is now on Moat Lane, about to stop on St Martin's Lane near St Martin's Church and Park Street. I would get off the bus at the 50 terminus on Moor Street.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/St Martins Bring (Jul 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

25th July 2021

I got off the bus early on High Street Bordesley, to walk up to Camp Hill. Got this view near Alcester Street of the Rotunda, 103 Colmore Row, Selfridges and the BT Tower. The self storage place has closed down I think.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 25072021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Later walking back up Digbeth near the Beorma Quarter. The Prince's Trust is in the Digbeth Cold Storage building. I saw a no 97 bus passing the building.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 25072021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Selfridges near the top of Digbeth. St Martin's Church on the left.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 25072021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Selfridges from Digbeth and on Park Street at the pedestrian traffic lights. A no 50 NXWM Platinum bus goes by.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 25072021 (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Later I got back on my bus at Moor Street Queensway (MS4), with another view of Birmingham Moor Street Station and pink Selfridges. The taxi rank outside.

dndimg alt="Selfridges" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pink Sfridges 25072021 (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

 

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80 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
21 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Roundhouse Birmingham: a timeline to reopening

Finally Roundhouse Birmingham has reopened to the public. Located at Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, it is on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline. Originally opened in 1874, to the designs of W. H. Ward as the Corporation Depot. Also used by the London and North Western Railway as a railway depot at the time. Now co-owned by the Canal & River Trust and National Trust.

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Roundhouse Birmingham: a timeline to reopening





Finally Roundhouse Birmingham has reopened to the public. Located at Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, it is on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline. Originally opened in 1874, to the designs of W. H. Ward as the Corporation Depot. Also used by the London and North Western Railway as a railway depot at the time. Now co-owned by the Canal & River Trust and National Trust.


History of Roundhouse Birmingham

A crescent shaped Grade II* listed building, it was built for the Corporation of Birmingham from 1873 to 1874, to the designs of William Henry Ward (he also designed the Great Western Arcade). The two gatehouses facing the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street were completed in 1885. It was originally named Corporation Wharf, as it was near the Birmingham Canal. It was also used as a large railway depot for the London and North Western Railway, on the Stour Valley Line.

The site was arranged to create a highly secure internal storage environment, for open air storage, horses and maintenance.

Pevsner describes it having a pair of picturesque Gothic lodges. And that inside was more of a semicircular range with a cartway running under it's centre to the canal. With evocative cobbled pavements.

The building was used by the City of Birmingham Engineers Department until the 1980s, when it became redundant and was sold. It was bought by British Waterways (now the Canal & River Trust) in 2001.

Unused for many years, other than part of it as a nursery school, the Canal & River Trust and the National Trust gained funding in 2017 for the restoration of the building, and to open it up to the public. It should have opened in 2020, but delays due to the pandemic, means it won't open now until at least late summer 2021.

Some of the earliest tours by narrowboat have started in late July 2021, during the summer heatwave.

 

2009

Some of my earliest photos of the Roundhouse, taken from the opposite towpath on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline, between the Sheepcote Street Bridge and St Vincent Street Bridge.

 

15th May 2009

At the time there was a lot of narrowboats moored up on both sides of the towpath next to the Roundhouse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There was still a brick wall alongside the Roundhouse, part of it would be later removed when restoration works began years later.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2009) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2013

A look at the pair of gatehouses from the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, and the first look at the inside of the horseshoe courtyard for the first time. A few months later, I saw the Roundhouse close up from the towpath.

 

23rd February 2013

At the time the Roundhouse for for sale or to let, and the junction here was a bit different.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Roundhouse BCN Mainline (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Signs on the gate "Warning Kingdom Security".

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Feb 2013).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This is what the horseshoe courtyard looked like at the time, years before the restoration began.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Roundhouse BCN Mainline (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

18th May 2013

A look through the railings to the back of the Roundhouse. The former Fiddle & Bone pub on the right was derelict at the time, but would be restored and reopen a few years later.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2015

The Fiddle & Bone pub was restored and reopened, so time to look at the Roundhouse again from the canalside towpath.

 

26th December 2015

It was nice to see the Fiddle & Bone restored. They put out painted picnic benches at the time, and they sealed off the arches in the Roundhouse behind.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2015) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This area was all part of the Fiddle & Bone beer garden, at the back of the Roundhouse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2015) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2017

A few years later, the Fiddle & Bone was renamed to The Distillery.

 

26th October 2017

By now, the Roundhouse was co-owned by the National Trust and Canal & River Trust, and within a few years would begin work to restore the building. Meanwhile I was having a look at The Distillery from the opposite side of the canal.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Two years after seeing The Distillery, the Roundhouse next door would start to get restored.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is an entrance to the pub from the canalside, there was formerly one from the first floor on Sheepcote Street.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2019

During the BCN 250 celebrations, I noticed that work to restored the Roundhouse had begun.

 

2nd November 2019

There was a parade of narrowboats up and down the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline at the time for BCN 250, while the Roundhouse was under scaffolding.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Scaffolding up the right hand side of the Roundhouse, they were also replacing the old windows.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Now called Roundhouse Birmingham. The area out front was still a beer garden for The Distillery, but the picnic benches were no longer painted.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

It should have been completed and reopened by 2020, but the pandemic resulted in it being delayed until 2021.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

While at the time this was the beer garden of The Distillery, in future it would (probably) also act as the public entrance to Roundhouse Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

27th December 2019

One last update before the end of 2019, and before I heard about the coming virus. The pair of lodges were under scaffolding. Road layout had changed on St Vincent Street, near Sheepcote Street.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Part of the Roundhouse already had new windows on one side.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Window view of another window.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Similar window shot as the last one.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This area (below) had a temporary wooden hoarding in place. They would later install a window here. Probably an area for people to view the canal out of the Roundhouse?

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2021

My first major photo update of the Roundhouse since the pandemic began, and in time for it opening to the public to the first time.

 

14th July 2021

Views of the Roundhouse from the Sheepcote Street Bridge. Including the Annatomix rustic horse street art.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The Distillery is on the right. Entrance from the canalside, they make Roundhouse Gin here.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The pair of Victorian lodges fully restored, at the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street. Was a homeless man sitting close to the gate, so didn't want to get too close to him.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A zoom in beyond the gate to the horseshoe courtyard area.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

20th July 2021

Views from the opposite side of the BCN Mainline canal, towards the Roundhouse. I walked past the Victoria narrowboat dropping off visitors, below the Sheepcote Street bridge.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Famed Birmingham street artist Annatomix was commissioned to paint this wall, she has painted a rustic horse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Onto St Vincent Street, a view towards this gate, all fully restored, with new windows installed.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The horseshoe shaped courtyard, seen inside of the gate from the St Vincent Street corner with Sheepcote Street. Some of the bricks on the cobbled surface have been replaced.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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80 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
07 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Stratford House: a timber framed survivor dating to 1601

Located in Highgate near Highgate Park is a remarkable survival. Stratford House is close to Highgate Middleway on the no 50 bus route. You can see it from the bus on Moseley Road and New Moseley Road. Built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget, it was once surrounded by farmland. In recent years it's been offices and a swingers club. A fire in 2015, led to restoration 2016.

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Stratford House: a timber framed survivor dating to 1601





Located in Highgate near Highgate Park is a remarkable survival. Stratford House is close to Highgate Middleway on the no 50 bus route. You can see it from the bus on Moseley Road and New Moseley Road. Built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget, it was once surrounded by farmland. In recent years it's been offices and a swingers club. A fire in 2015, led to restoration 2016.


On the trail between Digbeth and Kings Heath, if you are getting the no 50 National Express West Midlands Platinum bus (you can catch it from outside Selfridges on Moor Street in the City Centre). Heading past Highgate Park on Moseley Road, you will spot Stratford House. One of the oldest remaining buildings within the City Centre and within the middle ring road, dating to 1601 (last few years of Tudor and Elizabethan England).

 

Stratford House is located at 82 Stratford Place, Highgate, Birmingham B12 0HT. Since 2020 it has been the offices of Age UK Birmingham and Age UK Sandwell.

 

I personally think it could become a museum, run by the Birmingham Museums Trust, or the National Trust. With period furniture. The noise from the passing traffic on Highgate Middleway might causes issues though.

 

The history of Stratford House

The timber framed manor house was built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget. It was originally part of a 20 acre farm that Ambrose owned. He farmed sheep, pigs, oxen and cows on the land.

In 1840, a goods yard was opened nearby at Camp Hill by the Midland Railway. The companies successor, the London, Midland and Scottish Railway, in 1926 bought the house and wanted to demolish it. There was a public outcry and the house was saved.

There was further plans to demolish the house in the 1950s due to it dilapidated state. But it was bought by Ivor Adams in 1954 and it was saved. It has been a Grade II* listed building since 1952.

 

The following two images taken from the Birmingham Museums Trust Collection, Digital Image Resourse and are in the Public Domain and dates to the early 1950s. Under the Creative Commons Zero Licence (CCO).

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V79 Stratford House Camp Hill Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House in 1950. Ink drawing by John L. Baker. Topographical view of Birmingham, from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection.

 

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1976V92 Stratford Place Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Old houses, Stratford Place, Birmingham in 1951. Watercolour. By Allen Edward Everitt. Topographical view of Birmingham, from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection.

 

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the house was home to Network Records, one of the UK's exponents of Techno music.

 

Stratford House, 2010

By the late 2000s and early 2010s it was occupied by Birmingham Centre for Art Therapies (BCAT).

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House 2010.JPG" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House on Stratford Place in 2010.

 

Stratford House, 2016

In 2014 it was a swingers club called the Tudor Lounge (who signed a 10 year lease with Birmingham City Council). This opened in January 2015, but by December 2015 there was a major fire here. The building was extensively restored during 2016.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2016) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Restoration of Stratford House during April 2016. Views from the no 50 bus.

 

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (May 2016) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (May 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Restoration of Stratford House during May 2016. Seen from the Moseley Road in Highgate.

 

Stratford House, 2018

By 2018, Stratford House was fully restored, and was available to let.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (April 2018).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2018).jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> Stratford House fully restored as of April 2018

 

Stratford House, 2021

From 2020, the building is now home to Age UK Birmingham and Age UK Sandwell. In April 2021, Birmingham City Council approved plans for the road in front of Stratford House to be closed to create a Knott Garden. It lies within the Clean Air Zone. If you go onto Highgate Middleway, that is outside of the zone.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House at the end of June 2021.

 

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
05 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Old Crown in Digbeth, dating back to 1368!

The Old Crown in Digbeth claims to date back to 1368. The Grade II* listed building as it is now is more likely to have been built between 1450 and 1500, and could have been established as an inn from the 16th or 17th centuries. It has seen many changes over the centuries. Including road widening in the mid 20th century, and soon the Eastside Metro Extension (by the mid 2020s).

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The Old Crown in Digbeth, dating back to 1368!





The Old Crown in Digbeth claims to date back to 1368. The Grade II* listed building as it is now is more likely to have been built between 1450 and 1500, and could have been established as an inn from the 16th or 17th centuries. It has seen many changes over the centuries. Including road widening in the mid 20th century, and soon the Eastside Metro Extension (by the mid 2020s).


One of the oldest buildings in Birmingham, including within what is now the City Centre (as far as the middle ring road), is The Old Crown. They claim to date back to about 1368. For instance they celebrated their 649th birthday in 2017 with a ribbon on one of the doors.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Old Crown Dbeth (Sep 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

So as of 2021 they are now 653 years old!

 

History of The Old Crown

The Old Crown was probably built sometime between the year 1450 and 1500 (in Medieval and early Tudor times). Some evidence dating back to 1492. A man visiting Birmingham in 1538 described the building as a "mansion house made of timber". It is thought that the building was originally built as the Guildhall and School of St. John, Deritend. In 1589 the building was bought by "John Dyckson, alias Bayleys". It remained in the Dixon family for the next 100 years. It may have began to be used as an inn from this time, especially in the years following the Spanish Armada, and gained the name "Crown".

Although later evidence suggests it was used as an inn by around 1626, and being called the Crowne by 1666. During 1643, the forces of Prince Rupert attacking Birmingham during the Civil War (on the way to fire his musket at the cockerel of the old St Martin's Church), there was some skirmishes near the inn.

The house was converted into two houses in 1684, and then into three by 1693. It remained three houses until the 19th century. Joshua Toulmin Smith saved the building in 1851, from demolition by the Corporation of Birmingham (who wanted to improve the street). The Corporation again proposed to knock it down in 1856 and 1862, but Smith saved it each time.

 

The following three Public Domain Dedication images taken from the Birmingham Museums Trust Collection.

An etching of the Old Crown Inn, Deritend, Birmingham, 1895-1900, by Samuel Henry Baker (d. 1909).

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1970V130 Old Crown Inn Deritend.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A watercolour painting by George Warren Blackham of the Old Crown Inn Deritend, Birmingham. Probably in the late 19th century.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1956V372 Old Crown Inn Deritend Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

An etching of the Old Crown Inn, Deritend, Birmingham by J. Alfred Swatkins. Possibly late 19th or early 20th century, with the old tram tracks.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1965V8 Old Crown Inn Deritend Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

High Street Deritend, outside of The Old Crown was widened and reopened by 1955. This included removing the old tram tracks, and the old cobbled road surface. Buildings opposite were demolished, and the Bull Ring Trading Estate was later built there (on the site of St. John's Church, Deritend, which was demolished in 1947, after suffering damage during the Second World War in 1940).

 

Two vintage photos taken by the late Phyllis Nicklin, who was a tutor in Geography in the former Department of Extramural Studies, University of Birmingham. They were originally digitised by BrumPic.

The Old Crown in Digbeth taken by Phyllis Nicklin (University of Birmingham). This was probably before the road was widened in the mid 1950s.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Old Crown P Nicklin 2.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The Old Crown in Digbeth, taken in 1960 by Phyllis Nicklin (University of Birmingham). High Street Deritend had been widened in the 1950s.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown P Nicklin.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />


The Old Crown was bought by the Brennan family in 1991. In the summer of 1994, they found an old well, while doing repairs, when they were clearing out the old sheds at the rear of the property, which at the time had been closed off for more than 100 years. The Brennan family reopened the pub in 1998.

The pub is a Grade II* listed building (since 1952) at 186, 187 and 188 High Street Deritend, and is on the corner of Heath Mill Lane. It is situated to the right of the Custard Factory.

As of the summer of 2021, roadworks are taking place down on the Digbeth High Street. This is to build the Eastside Metro Extension. Which will be starting properly from July 2021. The route will go past the HS2 Curzon Street Station. Work has also began to built a Sprint bus route towards Solihull and Coventry on the A45 (via the Small Heath Highway and Coventry Road). It could be ready in time for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games.

 

The Old Crown in the 21st Century

The following images of The Old Crown were taken during October 2009 by Elliott Brown. This was on the first day that I would take photos around the Digbeth area.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The Old Crown 1368.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (10).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (12).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (14).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The Beer Garden / car park at the back from Heath Mill Lane.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (16).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Old Crown Coffee Club, seen from High Street Deritend during January 2014.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Jan 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Irish flags and bunting up, at The Old Crown, during March 2014 for the St Patrick's Day Festival. The parade used to take place down the Digbeth High Street each March until 2019.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2014) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A red ribbon on The Old Crown during November 2016, getting ready for Christmas. This view taken from the bus.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Nov 2016).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Old Crown during March 2017 for St Patrick's Day. Getting ready for The Father Ted's Lampa. The St Patrick's Fundraiser.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Digbeth 110318.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Seen in March 2018, with snow on the roof, was The Old Crown. Again getting ready for St Patrick's Day. The beer garden around the back, became the Guinness Village, to show the England vs Ireland Six Nations Rugby Union match on the TV. 

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

One year on, to March 2019. St Patrick's Day again at The Old Crown. This time it had signs on it for 13 Hop House Lager.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Passing The Old Crown in Digbeth on the no 4 bus during the middle of June 2021. This was during the Euro 2020 match between England and Croatia.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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